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Tuesday, 18 July 1995

  • word of mouth shame
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    The greater the shame, the more likely it is to call on its cousin in public relations, euphemism. "Ethnic cleansing", now there's a euphemism. We keep using the term because we lack the word that the euphemism "ethnic cleansing" is covering for. Tha...

  • Road rage meets country cool
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    "It's when two motorists gets so annoyed at each other's driving that one of them gets out and thumps the other one or maybe attacks his car," said the man called Ted. "Where do they do this?" said the farmer. "They must be driving bloody slowly to h...

  • Teach British? What's that?
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    After seven years of upheaval following the introduction of the national curriculum, teachers have been promised a five-year moratorium on further curriculum changes. Dr Nicholas Tate, the chief executive of the School Curriculum and Assessment Autho...

  • Roundheads who would steal our dreams
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    There are good reasons why thoughtful people of benign intent should abominate the lottery. It takes huge sums of money, much of it from the poorest who can ill afford it, and offers them odds that would make a bookie blush. This week the lottery sta...

  • LETTER:Tony Blair: New Age Tory
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: I feel, as a life-long Labour Party supporter living in a Tory heartland, profoundly depressed. Mr Blair's admiration of Margaret Thatcher, his stance on education, and to a lesser extent, health, not to mention nationalisation, smacks not of po...

  • LETTER:When hope tips scales of life and death
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: Angela Lambert, in supporting the killing of a two-year-old, fails to grasp the basic moral issues of euthanasia. She justifies her view by claiming that the boy would have "no possibility, ever, of a normal life". This may well be true, but thi...

  • POLEMIC; No way to ensure godly behaviour
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    This is not to say that the church should be soft on matters of personal morality, or serious breaches of church law. One of the drawbacks of the present system is precisely that it has become largely unworkable, except as a threat to induce resignat...

  • LETTER:Music of the mills
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: Jonathan Foster mentions the demise of Brown Bayley's steelworks and its replacement by the Don Valley Stadium (article on the Rolling Stones concert, 10 July). Your readers may be interested to know that steel is still made by the Don: a record...

  • LETTER:Options at M&S
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: Your article "M&S chiefs get pounds 5.4m in options" (13 July) misses two salient points. First, all share-option schemes operated by the company have been approved by shareholders. Second, while it is right to point out that directors are u...

  • LETTER: Sound advice
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: Your TV correspondent is so right about the Tour de France (12 July). We watch it, for the glimpses of beautiful France; poplar-lined highways, snow-capped Savoy Alps, little villages and cafes, tables with checked tablecloths, and of course old...

  • LETTER:Ministers and court agreed
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: Your report of the Court of Appeal's hearing in the Ordtech case ("Appeal court quashes 'gagging orders' ", 18 July) indicates that the public interest immunity certificates signed by me, Douglas Hurd and Mr Howley (for the Metropolitan Police) ...

  • LETTER: Decade of change
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: Was I alone in noting the irony of the BBC's mid-evening viewing on Saturday 15 July. On BBC1 the National Lottery Live. On BBC2 the Live Aid Concert commemorating the tenth anniversary of the concert. The contrast is a poignant and sad reminder...

  • LETTER:Does the West really want the Muslims driven out of Europe?
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: It should be recognised that Srebrenica, Zepa and Gorazde have for a long time been safe areas for Muslim terrorists behind the Serbian front lines. The Bosnian Serb authorities were therefore acting in conformity with the needs of international...

  • ANOTHER VIEW; Four stark choices in Bosnia
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    The truth that must be faced is that indecision, lack of a clear political aim and a failure of political will has resulted in the UN's troops in the front-line areas being at best an irrelevance and at worst a target for both sides. There are now on...

  • LEADING ARTICLE:Three strikes and you're out
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    The Board of Banking Supervision report places most of the blame on Nick Leeson, the rogue trader, Barings' managers and auditors. This is fair, so far as it goes, but it risks diverting attention from the problems of banking regulation, which are no...

  • LEADING ARTICLE:Howard plays on prejudice
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    But where were Home Secretary's facts? It turns out that the pounds 100m figure is mere speculation. It was arrived at by multiplying the number of illegal immigrants detected last year (about 13,000) by the maximum amount a single person could gain ...

  • LETTER:When hope tips scales of life and death
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: With reference to Angela Lambert's article "Dear Tim & Bronwen Stewart" (17 July ), I would not presume to comment on the Stewarts' agonising situation, but perhaps more than most I can understand something of their anguish. Our 18-year-old ...

  • Richard D North
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    All these types are in place as a group in Hereford prepares to take on the National Rivers Authority, "The Guardians of the Water Environment". The group wants to reopen the River Wye to big boats. It believes the river is dying, as abstraction by s...

  • chess
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    With the white knight covering c4 and c6, and the rook on d7 guarding d5 and d6, all White needs is a check from his other rook and Black is mated. Rb6, Rhd6, Re6, Rf6 and Rg6 threaten, respectively, Rxb5, Rd5, Re5, Rf5 and Rxg5 mate; we need to find...

  • meanwhile ...
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Claws out at Santa congress. A dispute has interfered with the smooth running of the 32nd World Santa Claus Conference which opened this week in Copenhagen. Finns, claiming to represent the sole true Father Christmas, have boycotted the event. All 13...

  • LETTER:Does the West really want the Muslims driven out of Europe?
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: Surely, if the UN withdraws from Bosnia, and if the Muslims are armed, the Islamic countries will be free to provide the men needed to use the weapons against the Serbs? It could be that an armed Bosnian horde of justifiably angry people would "...

  • LETTER:Does the West really want the Muslims driven out of Europe?
    Wednesday, 19 July 1995

    Sir: In his analysis of the recent events in Bosnia (17 July), James Fenton asks: "Are we ever going to cry 'enough'?" The answer is, obviously - no. British and other Western societies are not ashamed to admit their selfishness by saying that this i...

  • Pockets, naturally
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: My husband and I can answer your question "Where on earth do naturists keep their small change?" ("How to be a naturist", 13 July). It has a simple answer: in a pocket. The pocket, in our case, is on the inside of our beach kilts, which I made v...

  • Playing for the game, not the medals
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: I am in the course of writing a biography of my uncle, Brig-Gen R. J. Kentish, who, apart from other things, founded the National Playing Fields Association in 1924, under the auspices of the Duke of York (later King George VI). The aim of the a...

  • Less crime in the Thirties
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: I write in reply to the question as to why was there not more crime when the working class was deeply deprived in the Thirties (letter, 13 July)? In the distant past, I grew up in a "village" within a city. Times were hard, jobs were scarce, une...

  • 'Transport debate' was always a sham
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: Christian Wolmar's article "Has Mawhinney sold the greens down the river?" (8 July) shows that the former Transport Minister's "Great Transport Debate" was a sham. This is proven by his reinstatement of the Newbury Bypass and his cynical curtail...

  • Serbs' obsession with ethnic cleansing
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: The fall of Srebrenica could have been averted had the West's strategic thinkers taken a few lessons in psychology. The Serb obsession with "ethnic cleansing" has its origin in what can best be described as a purification compulsion. Hitler was ...

  • Try it my way ...
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: For the past few days I have been confined to barracks with a sprained ankle, and my copy of The River Cafe Cook Book has been a constant source of pleasure. It is quite beautifully produced and is full of inspiration. It seems sad that so many ...

  • Good health news
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: The press has developed a habit of rubbishing the NHS and the medical profession. Perhaps good news does not make good copy, but I have received a notice from the Chief Medical Officer of the Department of Health that, I think, merits a report i...

  • Why executive salaries have risen since 1980
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: Hamish McRae is too polite to our industries' bosses when trying to explain in "Pay and the Pavarotti factor" (13 July) how they have come to pay themselves so much. There is no evidence that the forces of international competition are compellin...

  • Serbs' obsession with ethnic cleansing
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: Mr Portillo says: "We're not in Bosnia to fight a war. We're there to save lives." Is it not now clear that in order to save lives, we have to fight to protect the safe havens and to ensure that the convoys get through? Yours faithfully, Stephen...

  • Why executive salaries have risen since 1980
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Sir: Top people's pay has risen disproportionately since 1980. Hamish McRae (13 July) finds an explanation for this in the operation of demand factors and warns us not to swing too hard against this phenomenon. The story he tells is incomplete. Deman...

  • Why Blair must give power to the people
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Blair, like Margaret Thatcher, is not really a party person. He has eschewed the warm embrace of ''being Labour''. He has no deep tribal tradition to fall back on. Despite a numerous and growing group of individual admirers, the party as a whole look...

  • Bath, boules and Bastille Day
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    One was the Youth Olympics - which, I am afraid to say, it never occurred to me to attend - held up on the university grounds at the top of the hill. The other one was the Bath Boules Contest, which takes place every year as near to Bastille Day as p...

  • Has Greenbury tamed the fat cats?
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    For the problem cannot be regulated. It is moral, conceptual and cultural. Massive pay rises in privatised utilities will fail in their avowed aims. Their executives are not dauntless risk-takers who chose challenging lifestyles, but men who dozed of...

  • Sobriety at the saloon
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Minister and civil servants could not discern a way of legislating against media infringements of privacy without badly compromising the freedom of the press. This recognition has led the Government to fall back on strengthened self-regulation. This ...

  • The wages of transparency
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Instead, Greenbury's stress is on information and accountability to shareholders, and on finding ways to align directors' and shareholders' interests in improving performance. He also recommends a small, sensible change, which the Chancellor immediat...

  • Ticket to a tragedy
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    For the second time in four days, Britain's railways are likely to be at a virtual standstill today. That means infuriating disruption for millions. For the industry, I believe it is tragic. Particularly, that is, because the railways can only expect...

  • Has Greenbury tamed the fat cats?
    Tuesday, 18 July 1995

    Successful companies are the economy. They pay taxes. They create jobs and pay wages out of which taxes are paid, families provided for and the prosperity of communities secured. They generate the wealth which government uses to provide education, he...

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