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Home 1995 September

Tuesday, 5 September 1995

  • yesterday was...
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    The tone deaf, as Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Khomenei, said that "teaching young people to read and play music makes them depraved and leads to corruption". Iranian cultural officials were reported as being unavailable for comment. A bad day fo...

  • Letter: Stop bashing Jeffrey Archer
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: I am less interested than Bryan Appleyard in the fact that Jeffrey Archer has a book deal worth pounds 32m. What really depresses me, however, is the fact that he is going to produce another three novels. Yours faithfully, Andrew Forbes Aberdeen

  • chess
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    The most fancied of all, Garry Kasparov, decided to give the London event a miss. With his PCA world title defence coming up next week against Anand, he said he needed time to acclimatise himself to New York. He was perhaps also happy not to pay anot...

  • backgammon
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    The initial reaction of most players when they first come across the concept of doubling is to think that if their opponent has an advantage then obviously they should decline the double and start a new game. However the basic mathematics of doubling...

  • Letter: Stop bashing Jeffrey Archer
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: Here we go again, bashing one of our most successful writers who gives pleasure and relaxation, to so many people. What arrogance comes from the pen of Brian Appleyard ("Lord of the nation's bad taste", 5 September). We all bring our own percept...

  • Letter: Twinkle, twinkle, little street-light fitting
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: It was gratifying to see that the menace posed by light pollution to our night skies is at last being recognised ("Seeing stars - if only we could", 4 September). However Jonathan Glancey was rather unfair in laying the blame at the door of stre...

  • Of course any new great movement has crackpot beginnings
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    The church was full of people who want to see a spiritual transformation of Western civilisation, and they want that spiritual transformation to go on to inform politics and economics. It was called a Rolling Parliament, a meeting of like-minded peop...

  • Leading Article: Better to blunder than to lie
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Greenpeace is different. Having humiliated Shell in June by stopping the deep-sea dumping of the Brent Spar, the environmental group made an embarrassing discovery. It found that its claims about the amount of oil on board the installation were wrong...

  • Letter: No shame
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: In your survey of public figures' private morality ("Secret lives of the new moralisers", 1 September; Letters, 4 September) none gave as a reason not to donate blood that they may have been at risk of infection with HIV. Yet, even with universa...

  • Give us more ambition, Tony
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    In fact, I do remember 1979 very well. It was the last time that Labour was in power. When Margaret Thatcher won the election, we were convinced that she would be a one-term prime minister. The Eighties turned out, however, to be Mrs Thatcher's decad...

  • Brave hearts and Tory ministers
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    The opening credits roll, reading " 'Rob Roy To Pay Westminster!' - A Scottish film made on Scottish soil with Scottish money using Scottish actors!" The credits fade. We become aware that we are in a small room occupied by some determined-looking me...

  • Letter: Twinkle, twinkle, little street-light fitting
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: I, too, am sad that the view of the stars is so often blotted out by bad lighting. Unfortunately the lighting engineers Mr Glancey spoke to were using the easy way out by claiming that they were acting for safety. Whenever the safety factor is u...

  • Letter: Spiritual literacy
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: The Chris Brain affair and other recent cult scandals provide, I believe, a strong argument for religious education. Our failure to acquaint large numbers of our children with any real understanding of the language and practice of religion is gi...

  • Letter: Unpublished but worth paying for
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: We would like to endorse the view expressed by Sir Douglas Hague in his article "The wrong debate on university standards" (30 August) relating to research in higher education. We are a training and consultancy unit of the University of the West...

  • word of mouth hanky-panky
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    The headmaster of a public school must, married or single, embrace a degree of monasticism, that is the quid pro quo, and even though the thought of a piece of tail might prey upon his mind, he knows that such poontang is out of bounds, that he owes ...

  • Leading Article: Why the law should study medicine
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Then came the Seventies, and one by one the props were knocked from under the profession. First the fixed scale of fees for conveyancing was done away with, allowing those involved in house sales and purchases to shop around. Then fee levels were dri...

  • Letter: EU must lead on foreign policy
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: David Howell's wide-ranging critique of British foreign policy ("Where Britain gets it wrong", 4 September) is justifiably sceptical of the US plan for Bosnia, but does not draw one logical conclusion. The UK must help improve Europe's capacity ...

  • ANOTHER VIEW: The moronic majority
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    British society is now more divided, unfair and ill at ease with itself than at any time since the war. While the fat cats of industry and quangos screw the country for every last penny, the rest of us are told to be patriotic and either take pay cut...

  • Letter: Labour's mouse for Edinburgh
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: Scotland returns 10 Conservatives out of 72 MPs to Westminster. Three out of four voters want nothing to do with a Conservative government here, yet they get one anyway. What Braveheart Blair (leading article, 1 September) has in mind for his ne...

  • Letter: Stop bashing Jeffrey Archer
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: If, by being "rude and vulgarly arrogant", Jeffrey Archer betrayed his true character to Bryan Appleyard (5 September), during their one telephone call, and the article itself gave an accurate insight into Bryan Appleyard's nature, it was probab...

  • Letter: A random and terrible disease
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: I read with interest your article "Veiled clues may solve the Elephant Man mystery" (2 September). However, I would like to clarify some of the points made in reference to the genetic condition known as neurofibromatosis. The author writes: one ...

  • When breast screening is best
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Resigning from the Government's breast cancer screening advisory group, his suggestion that the programme may be turning out to be an expensive mistake was greeted with howls of outrage from other breast cancer doctors. There are certain holy of holi...

  • Letter: Chairman's brief
    Wednesday, 6 September 1995

    Sir: Polly Toynbee's tirade against the appointment of Sir Thomas Boyd Carpenter to chair the Government's Social Security Advisory Committee ("Eminently qualified - for some other job", 30 August) shows her lack of understanding of the function of a...

  • lottery
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    All psychologists agree that one of the crucial factors in addiction- forming is a short time-gap between investment and reward. That is why scratch cards are doing so well and lottery video terminals will do even better when they are introduced. But...

  • it looks like...
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Alcoholic French crabs, after a wine producer sank 10,000 bottles of Pouilly Fume 1984 in the Bay of Biscay in a bid to help it acquire a fuller flavour. A bad summer for: American vampires, with the news that garlic consumption in the US has grown f...

  • Letter: Saving water: meters, permits, tankers and shared baths
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: I must be one of the few people who has some sympathy for the water companies which continue to maintain supplies as this prolonged period of hot weather, together with minimal rainfall, draws to a close. The sprinkler, or garden irrigation syst...

  • Why I'm switching to GEC
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Mr Lippitt is a former deputy secretary at the Department of Trade and Industry who was no doubt employed by GEC because his knowledge and overseas contacts were as extensive, if not more so, than mine. Among all our competitors it is accepted that b...

  • Lord of the nation's bad taste
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    The answers to these questions - political patronage, the power of crude energy, the invincible bad taste of the Tory grassroots, the invincible bad taste of Jeffrey Archer - are well known and easily, not to say repeatedly, listed. The tale of the r...

  • Letter: Tomorrow's world
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: So, David Howell wonders why Britain's foreign policy is so occupied with the European Union while the Commonwealth is neglected ("Where Britain gets it wrong", 4 September)? I would have thought the reason is obvious: the Commonwealth is our pa...

  • Letter: Hell is on holiday - with the British
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: Your correspondent Nigel Williams (letter, 3 September, who anticipates holidaying in Britain next year has got it wrong. Britain is a pleasant place to holiday only because the undesirable have gone abroad. Imagine our shores and countryside cl...

  • Letter: Everest in perspective
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: I was interested to read in recent correspondence (letters, 25 and 29 August) about whether Tenzing Norgay or Edmund Hillary first set foot on the summit of Everest. It may be helpful if I refer any readers interested in this question to Hillary...

  • Letter: Saving water: meters, permits, tankers and shared baths
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: I am already awaiting, with some anticipation, the inevitable arrival of the Water Consumer's Charter, to be accompanied by an official letter setting arbitrary and largely unrealistic targets in order to pacify an angered public. Interesting th...

  • Leading Article: Bank rage hits Oxfordshire
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    The change was probably inevitable as different parts of the financial system merged into each other and competition increased. But those who used to look up to bank officials - much as they might a doctor or a priest - have suffered culture shock. T...

  • Leading Article: Women's talk in China
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    The sneerers have two main arguments. The first is that the very idea of a UN world conference on women is ludicrous, because there is no such thing as a set of issues relevant to women across the world, and that even if there were, a conference of g...

  • First, catch your haricot bean
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    "In France, haricot beans form a principal part in the staple articles of food for the working classes, and indeed for the entire population; it is much to be desired that some effectual means should be adopted for the purpose of introducing and enco...

  • Letter: Exams: compare and contrast
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: How can one compare the 1996 Olympic 100 metres running champion with the 1896 one? The former's time may be faster and against more opposition, but will have been achieved with the benefit of modern diets, coaching and equipment. Obviously, one...

  • Letter: Hackney's great theatrical past
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: I was delighted to read Andrew John Davies's "Site unseen" (22 August) on the Theatre in Shoreditch. It is rarely recognised that the first permanent purpose-built theatre in the country was built in 1576 in Shoreditch, now part of Hackney. So, ...

  • Letter: Jeremy Bentham and disarmament
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: William Hartston ("Sarcastic yak captures picturesque motor-car", 28 August) celebrates the centenary, bicentenary, etc, of the entry of various words "into the language", as measured by their appearance in the Oxford English Dictionary. Flatter...

  • site unseen; The Stella Memorial, Southampton
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Southampton contains a particularly fine collection of tributes. It also has its own Titanic commemoration, tucked away in a corner of East Park and honouring the ship's 38 "Engineer Officers", none of whom survived the disaster on 15th April 1912. T...

  • true gripes; jazz drummers
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Tony had a point though. This drummer had been scraping his drumkit with a pair of brushes all night and hadn't even touched his sticks. Most jazz drummers seem to be like this. It is as if they are afraid of making too much noise. It would be better...

  • Don't just sit there, change something
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    They want to kick sand in a few faces. Major can face the right without the threat of a leadership challenge; Blair has a familiar target in the trade union-led revolt on the minimum wage. The spin doctors, and the consultants of googly, will be usin...

  • Letter: Fluid words and helpful fluids
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Broadbent Sir: Jonathan Glancey is quite right ("Qwerty lovers do it manually", 28 August) to describe certain typewriters as design classics. I too keep my Olivetti portable as a well-designed object, but I would never dream of using it, for, like t...

  • chess
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Against both 1.e4 and 1.d4 Anand seems ready to play anything. Kasparov has fared better against him with 1.d4, which will probably be his main weapon. But that will be what he is expecting, so it might be better to... oh, never mind, forget it. Let'...

  • Letter: Saving water: meters, permits, tankers and shared baths
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: Would it concentrate the Government's mind, I wonder, if non-metered water consumers threatened to leave their water taps open until a law was passed forcing water companies to fix their own water leaks? Yours faithfully, Jane Stewart Bristol

  • Letter: Saving water: meters, permits, tankers and shared baths
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: "Life is better bathing with a friend," you correctly inform us in today's editorial (2 September). However, you then incorrectly trace the origins of tub-sharing back to the summer drought of 1976. In fact it was in January 1974 that citizens w...

  • Letter: Saving water: meters, permits, tankers and shared baths
    Tuesday, 5 September 1995

    Sir: Michael Taylor (letter, 29 August) uses unsound logic in arguing against water meters because of the consequences for poor families with many children. There are arguments against the introduction of meters, but paying for what you consume is no...

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