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Home 1998 January

Thursday, 1 January 1998

  • Labour and necessity: Welfare reform? We really don't have any choice
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The simple truth is that our system of welfare does not work. It does not deliver help to those most in need. It does not help us fight the war on poverty. And it has lost sight of the values upon which it was founded. Responsibility, independence, d...

  • Jo and Helen say `I do': Two weddings and it's back in fashion
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Mirren wed her partner, the film director Taylor Hackman, in a remote church in the Scottish Highlands on New Year's Eve. Brand reportedly told friends via a line in their Christmas cards that she had just tied the knot with her boyfriend, Bernie Bou...

  • A state of denial: They're so out of it they can't face reality (the law-makers, that is)
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Obviously, had any member of the Cabinet ever inhaled, they would not be doing the good works that they are now, such as swiping money from lone mothers. Instead they would be kicking their doors down to nick their videos. Had any tabloid journalists...

  • Letter: Blair and Lib Dems
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    From the Liberal point of view - and over the entire 20th century, Labour's too - it was Lloyd George's arrogance that led to a century of Conservative Party domination. When the trade unionists approached Lloyd George to ask him to prosecute their c...

  • Letter: Cannabis arrests
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The lad did what many other UK people do each day - pass a small amount of cannabis to someone who wants it. The annoying thing is that the cost, both economic and to police time, will all come out of the public pocket. To what end? Punishing someone...

  • Letter: Emotional Major
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Presumably, in Mr Major's book, irritation and anger at Prime Minister's Question Time do not count as emotions; or maybe he adopted this view when he ceased to be Prime Minister. LOUIS CAZEAU Edgware, Middlesex

  • And now, a garlic for America, and a modest proposal for colonial contagion
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    JULY '98. World Cup in full swing in France. Scotland knocked out by losing 6-5 to Jamaica, after leading 5-0 with 10 minutes to go. Scottish manager Craig Brown says: "It's the same old story. We have only ourselves to blame. We had it for the takin...

  • Letter: Secular knowledge
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Those who have called themselves secularists since the term was adopted in 1851 have not advocated an "emphasis upon individual self-interest" or the "privatisation of morality", let alone "nurtured" "nationalism". And it is nonsense to say that we a...

  • Letter: Suffolk home truth
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    May an uninvolved bystander merely mention the old saying "you can always tell a Yorkshireman, but you can't often tell him very much". Sadly, this frequently appears to be true. GEOFFREY ELLIS Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk

  • Leading Article: The killers we indulge, and those we don't
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Selective amnesia is good mental hygiene, but how to decide what to junk? At what point do we not only forget, but in forgetting start to forgive? The latter half of the 20th century has seen many examples of a curious transformation. Yesterday's fre...

  • Letter: Equal opportunities
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The EOC will not be advising the Government next month that the Sex Discrimination Act could be amended to allow parties to give priority to women. Our view is that the law is unclear and, even if the SDA is amended, it will not remove the possibilit...

  • Letter: IMF and debt policy
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Because of concerns that this process could in turn undermine the international financial system, much of the energy of the IMF at that time was devoted to arranging rescue packages for the most heavily indebted developing countries. Since South Kore...

  • Letter: Blair and Lib Dems
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    First, the history of coalition governments under a first-past-the-post (FPTP) electoral system shows that, at the subsequent election, the perceived electoral choice is for the government (vote for the larger party) or against it (vote for the oppos...

  • Letter: Blair and Lib Dems
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Keynes's central insight was that economies were cyclically unstable. He believed the state should try to stabilise economic activity by means of fiscal policy - with the implication that public revenues and expenditure should balance over the course...

  • Letter: Cannabis arrests
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    DAVID MANNION Colne, Lancashire

  • Letter: IMF and debt policy
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The capitalist system has trapped us all in a vicious circle in which insatiability of demand has become an economic imperative, the alternative being collapse of production and loss of jobs. Hence the rumour is that the Koreans may flood the world w...

  • Share the tribal language and you will always find a welcome
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    It is the turn-of-the-year interregnum, a time for calm reflection with mature and philosophically-disposed associates. Which is why we find ourselves in this pleasant bar, 10 of us, at 1.15 in the rainy night-time. Michael the accordion player - hav...

  • Letter: Funds for the Dome
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Sir: Mick Fickling's letter (30 December) gives the impression that the Millennium Experience is being funded from tax revenues. This is simply not the case. In fact, the Experience is not receiving any money from the Treasury. It is being paid for t...

  • Letter: Old Labour
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Sir: While having a clear-out of old papers, I came across a Labour Party policy document from about September 1996, which promises "Women will benefit from a range of our policies including . . . support for single- parent families". ALLAN DEEDS Dav...

  • Letter: Cold comfort
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Sir: James Jacoby leaves us wondering (Letters, 30 December) whether the lock he proposes is to keep the contents of his fridge safe from his ever-hungry teenage sons, or, perhaps understandably at this time of year, to make a convenient form of sub-...

  • Letter: Chez Jesus
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Sir: It states very clearly in the Bible that the wise men visited Jesus in a house (Matthew ch2 v11), not a stable (Meanings of Christmas, 29 and 30 December). Why on earth would a couple with a new baby want to remain in an insalubrious stable any ...

  • Letter: Green taxation
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    KAVI D CAPILDEO Port of Spain, Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

  • Letter: Jail university
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Sir: Your article "Rooms at the Ritz cheaper than places in child jails" (30 December) leads me to suggest that the Home Office should extract a weekly payment from the parents of the children in these new jails. It would only be a token sum but why ...

  • You can't legislate for happiness, but you can try
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Government may marginally affect how much money we have in our pockets. But sophisticated research into happiness suggests that there is no correlation between increases in cash and increases in happiness for most people. (Yes, all those old homilies...

  • Letter: Victims of violence
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Sir: Our professional experience shows that one of the crucial lessons from the new Birmingham research ("Violent videos don't provoke young people. Violence does", 29 December) is that there is no "quick fix" for this social problem. Above all, a na...

  • It will be a time of wars and willies. Lots of lovely news, in fact
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    International news used to consist of events that were unexpected and dramatic, sometimes villainous, and which could shape the destiny of peoples and states. Diana's death though was ultimately merely that of a super- celebrity, however unexpected. ...

  • Letter: Green taxation
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Sir: The main problem with taxation as a means of combating pollution, congestion and similar nuisances ("The questionable credentials of green taxes", 29 December) is that governments become dependent on the revenue it raises. They therefore acquire...

  • Letter: Green taxation
    Thursday, 1 January 1998

    Truly hypothecated green taxation offers a method by which government can fully enforce the principle that "the polluter pays" and in the process give a boost to energy-saving and waste-minimising industries. MARK ELTRINGHAM Egglescliffe, Teesside Be...

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