The Independent | Archive
Home 1998 January

Friday, 2 January 1998

  • Not everything shrinks with movie therapy
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    You cannot budge until you know whether the Swede, the Dane or the Finn will lift more slot machines, run round and round carrying a rock (an ancient Icelandic custom apparently) and push a truck across the finishing line first. (For your information...

  • Letter: Cats at Christmas
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: The kitten bought by Rupert Cornwell as a Christmas present for his young son ("On the unseasonal death of a pet", 24 December) had been purchased from a pet shop and Mr Cornwell was told by the shopkeeper that it was seven weeks old. Within day...

  • With flamingos and parrots, it is paradise in a bubble. And spiritually crushing
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    CenterParcs are a Dutch idea, now successfully exported to Britain and to France. The concept is simple: an inland holiday camp for the relatively affluent and sporty, aimed at families with young or teenage kids, but also popular, by my observation,...

  • Football mania has a lot to answer for
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    As ever, there's a grain of truth in the satire; and whilst the British can never lay claim to the extremes generated by American society, the statistics released by Scotland Yard yesterday will cause a shudder among the parents of teenage girls thro...

  • Leading Article: Saga that shows you can't keep a good story down
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Today we, like other papers, are able to tell the full story. It is no longer the case, as it had been throughout the Christmas holiday season, that the political and journalistic establishment knew the identity of the minister but the rest of Britai...

  • Letter: Supermarket strike
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: Your series of reports on supermarkets (from 29 December) is typically consumerist in focus. Try another angle. The large supermarkets employ large workforces, most of which are organised in trade unions. Their power, should they decide to use i...

  • Letter: Here's the number
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: Charles Arthur is incorrect in claiming that all railway stations are no longer listed in the telephone directory ("Mystery tale of the missing railway stations", 31 December). A glance at the Yellow Pages for Shropshire, Hereford and Mid-Wales ...

  • Letter: Hunt sabotage
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: Julie Roxburgh claims (letter, 29 December) that hunt saboteurs would never harm an animal. This is not true. One only has to watch the Boxing Day footage of the Essex and Farmers' Union hunt to see a saboteur deliberately terrifying horses by t...

  • Letter: Out of joint
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: I can understand why an article about cannabis ("They're so out of it they can't face reality", 2 January) is often accompanied by a picture of a joint and a small pile of weed - presumably so that Cabinet Ministers know what they're talking abo...

  • Letter: Anti-anti-anti smoking
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    GEORGE GoMoRI Darwin College, Cambridge

  • Letter: Rebel MEPs
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: I'm afraid my erstwhile colleagues Hugh Kerr and Ken Coates are being a little economical with the truth ("Rebel MEPs accuse Labour machine of dirty tricks", 2 January). There is no necessity for an annual re-affirmation of political group membe...

  • Letter: A modest proposal
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: It is clear that the Government does not consider that the rearing of children can be called "work". The Government might therefore prefer that all women in the UK should stop rearing children so that they could, instead, engage in "real work". ...

  • Letter: Anti-anti-anti-smoking
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: Virginia Ironside has become as big an anti-anti- smoking bore as any of the anti-smoking bores whom she rightly castigates (Dilemmas, 1 January). Bores are, by definition, tedious, but Ms Ironside is dangerous also, because she succeeds in givi...

  • Letter: Nerd or profiteer?
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: What a carry-on up the cyber path ("How the nerds are leading us up the cyber path", 27 December). Do I detect a whiff of sociological cybermanure? Given that Bill Gates's lifestyle is unlike yours and mine, we can ask if that goes with being a ...

  • Letter from the editor
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Well, here comes a confession: I too like single-section papers. If we had different printing presses (four-tower, in the jargon, not three-tower) and could expand the main broadsheet paper beyond 32 pages, then I would love to return to the purity o...

  • Letter: Paying for the Pill
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    Sir: It would be an astonishing irony indeed if free contraception, which has survived 18 years of Conservative government, were now to fall victim to a New Labour government with more than one hundred women MPs ("Prescription charge plan for Pill", ...

  • quote unquote
    Saturday, 3 January 1998

    I'll eat something out of the fridge with its sell-by date glaring back at me, salmonella winking at me in neon lights. But life's too short. I can't be worrying about salmonella when I'm worrying about hitting my high-Cs - Lesley Garrett, soprano Vi...

  • Labour and necessity: Welfare reform? We really don't have any choice
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The simple truth is that our system of welfare does not work. It does not deliver help to those most in need. It does not help us fight the war on poverty. And it has lost sight of the values upon which it was founded. Responsibility, independence, d...

  • Jo and Helen say `I do': Two weddings and it's back in fashion
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Mirren wed her partner, the film director Taylor Hackman, in a remote church in the Scottish Highlands on New Year's Eve. Brand reportedly told friends via a line in their Christmas cards that she had just tied the knot with her boyfriend, Bernie Bou...

  • A state of denial: They're so out of it they can't face reality (the law-makers, that is)
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Obviously, had any member of the Cabinet ever inhaled, they would not be doing the good works that they are now, such as swiping money from lone mothers. Instead they would be kicking their doors down to nick their videos. Had any tabloid journalists...

  • Letter: Blair and Lib Dems
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    From the Liberal point of view - and over the entire 20th century, Labour's too - it was Lloyd George's arrogance that led to a century of Conservative Party domination. When the trade unionists approached Lloyd George to ask him to prosecute their c...

  • Letter: Cannabis arrests
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The lad did what many other UK people do each day - pass a small amount of cannabis to someone who wants it. The annoying thing is that the cost, both economic and to police time, will all come out of the public pocket. To what end? Punishing someone...

  • Letter: Emotional Major
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Presumably, in Mr Major's book, irritation and anger at Prime Minister's Question Time do not count as emotions; or maybe he adopted this view when he ceased to be Prime Minister. LOUIS CAZEAU Edgware, Middlesex

  • And now, a garlic for America, and a modest proposal for colonial contagion
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    JULY '98. World Cup in full swing in France. Scotland knocked out by losing 6-5 to Jamaica, after leading 5-0 with 10 minutes to go. Scottish manager Craig Brown says: "It's the same old story. We have only ourselves to blame. We had it for the takin...

  • Letter: Secular knowledge
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Those who have called themselves secularists since the term was adopted in 1851 have not advocated an "emphasis upon individual self-interest" or the "privatisation of morality", let alone "nurtured" "nationalism". And it is nonsense to say that we a...

  • Letter: Suffolk home truth
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    May an uninvolved bystander merely mention the old saying "you can always tell a Yorkshireman, but you can't often tell him very much". Sadly, this frequently appears to be true. GEOFFREY ELLIS Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk

  • Leading Article: The killers we indulge, and those we don't
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Selective amnesia is good mental hygiene, but how to decide what to junk? At what point do we not only forget, but in forgetting start to forgive? The latter half of the 20th century has seen many examples of a curious transformation. Yesterday's fre...

  • Letter: Equal opportunities
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The EOC will not be advising the Government next month that the Sex Discrimination Act could be amended to allow parties to give priority to women. Our view is that the law is unclear and, even if the SDA is amended, it will not remove the possibilit...

  • Letter: IMF and debt policy
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Because of concerns that this process could in turn undermine the international financial system, much of the energy of the IMF at that time was devoted to arranging rescue packages for the most heavily indebted developing countries. Since South Kore...

  • Letter: Blair and Lib Dems
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    First, the history of coalition governments under a first-past-the-post (FPTP) electoral system shows that, at the subsequent election, the perceived electoral choice is for the government (vote for the larger party) or against it (vote for the oppos...

  • Letter: Blair and Lib Dems
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    Keynes's central insight was that economies were cyclically unstable. He believed the state should try to stabilise economic activity by means of fiscal policy - with the implication that public revenues and expenditure should balance over the course...

  • Letter: Cannabis arrests
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    DAVID MANNION Colne, Lancashire

  • Letter: IMF and debt policy
    Friday, 2 January 1998

    The capitalist system has trapped us all in a vicious circle in which insatiability of demand has become an economic imperative, the alternative being collapse of production and loss of jobs. Hence the rumour is that the Koreans may flood the world w...

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Quantitative Developer

£700 per day: Harrington Starr: Quantitative Developer C++, Python, STL, R, PD...

Web developer (C#, MVC4, HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, Jquery)

£30000 - £44000 per annum + Bonus+Benefits+Package: Harrington Starr: Web deve...

Senior Automation QA Engineer (Java, Selenium WebDriver, Agile)

£40000 - £65000 per annum + benefits+bonus+package: Harrington Starr: Senior A...

Web developer (C#.NET, ASP.NET, MVC3/4, HTML5, CSS3, JAVASCRIPT

£35000 - £45000 per annum + benefits+bonus+package: Harrington Starr: Web deve...

Day In a Page

Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?
Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award: 'making a quip as funny as possible is an art'

Beyond a joke

Tim Vine, winner of the Funniest Joke of the Fringe award, has nigh-on 200 in his act. So how are they conceived?
The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

The late Peter O'Toole shines in 'Katherine of Alexandria' despite illness

Sadly though, the Lawrence of Arabia star is not around to lend his own critique
Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire: The joy of camping in a wetland nature reserve and sleeping under the stars

A wild night out

Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire offers a rare chance to camp in a wetland nature reserve
Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition: It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans

Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition

It’s the font that’s openly ridiculed for its jaunty style, but figures of fun have their fans
Besiktas vs Arsenal: Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie

Besiktas vs Arsenal

Five things we learnt from the Champions League first-leg tie
Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

Rory McIlroy a smash hit on the US talk show circuit

As the Northern Irishman prepares for the Barclays, he finds time to appear on TV in the States, where he’s now such a global superstar that he needs no introduction
Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to Formula One

Boy racer Max Verstappen stays relaxed over step up to F1

The 16-year-old will become the sport’s youngest-ever driver when he makes his debut for Toro Rosso next season
Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

Fear brings the enemies of Isis together at last

But belated attempts to unite will be to no avail if the Sunni caliphate remains strong in Syria, says Patrick Cockburn
Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I would end up killing myself in jail'

Charlie Gilmour: 'I wondered if I'd end up killing myself in jail'

Following last week's report on prison suicides, the former inmate asks how much progress we have made in the 50 years since the abolition of capital punishment