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Home 1998 November

Saturday, 14 November 1998

  • Flat Earth
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    WE WERE talking recently about famous "sayings" that were in fact never said, from "Play it again, Sam" to "You've never had it so good". So let's get this straight: Robin Cook did not say he wanted an ethical foreign policy. Who says he never said i...

  • The Diary: At least on a tour you may find a bathroom
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    So I landed here, thinking I'd left sex scandals behind. But the minute I pick up a newspaper, I see the front page covered in sex stories of every kind. One politician is going into a park, another is coming out of a closet, the third is going into ...

  • Human rights - your judgement or mine?
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    The Human Rights Act is no ordinary statute. Conceived as a piece of ethical engineering by a new-broom Labour government addicted to the soundbite, its terms are so complex and obscure that the only thing certain to result is an outpouring of litiga...

  • Letter: German intentions in 1914 are still far from clear
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    In 1914, the British government was an imperial body, not a national one, which ruled nearly a quarter of mankind but which gave no direct voice in its decisions to the majority of its subjects. One of the immediate casualties of our war policy in 19...

  • The voice of liberal America Profile: Alistair Cooke
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    In his talks - and, oh, how rare it is now for such a boring format as a talk, as distinct from a phone-in or at any rate a discussion, to be broadcast on the restless, would-be trendy BBC - in his classic Letter From America series, and in his count...

  • Letter: Two leaders who do more damage than Hamas
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    Considering the deep-rooted resentment throughout the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, extreme movements are inevitable. But they are a minority. They can be dealt with by leaders who see eye-to-eye on the sort of peace their people and future generatio...

  • Letter: 'Oppressed' but successful women
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    Now, however, it seems that teenage girls are not the all-conquering Amazons we have been led to believe, but drug-abusing, violent delinquents and inadequates in need of special help ("Teen girls urged to admire Role Model Spice", 8 November). There...

  • Leading Article: Peace for the Prince
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    When the Prince is accused of being out of touch - whether with a floundering Church of England, a soulless political culture or an increasingly unscrupulous commercial world - it is difficult not to reflect, thankfully, that at least someone is. The...

  • Another war with Iraq will solve nothing - just like the last one
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    America and its allies have blasted Iraq three times since 1991, and almost blasted it a fourth time last winter, when Saddam declined to allow United Nations weapons inspectors to creep and crawl wherever they liked inside his country. Whatever it i...

  • Letter: Treat the whole person
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    As the forensic psychiatrist in your article suggests, the root causes of sex offending are related to the whole person. For example, such offenders are often people who have difficulty forming satisfactory peer relationships. Surely, then, a "whole ...

  • Glad to be a thinker? Beware Blair's whipping boys will stalk
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    The cause of this collapse was not, as has so often been claimed, the abolition of the "proscribed list". This was a list of organisations, such as the British-Soviet Friendship Society and Housewives for Peace, which were Communist fronts. Ever sinc...

  • Barbie in a sari? Now that's exotic
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    Walking through the city centre, shortly after I got off the plane from London, I remembered a friend's remark that it resembled the Metro centre in Gateshead. The very next morning, the main story in the Straits Times was "Singapore in recession". T...

  • No longer outraged
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    Journalists today would not dare claim to be the modern substitute for gods, although some of their proprietors might. But they still imply that their pillorying of public figures imposes some sort of moral restraint. Their attitude to celebrity case...

  • End of story
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    THERE'S FIVE of us sitting at a pavement cafe in Chinatown getting some authentic local nosh down our necks. We've been holed up in a five-star hotel for the past four days and it's our first opportunity to get out and about and have a gander at the ...

  • Letter: 'Oppressed' but successful women
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    According to your list of "worrying trends", young men are more likely to be the victims of violence, more likely to use drugs, more likely to abuse alcohol and less likely to get A-levels. You cite pay differentials of pounds 4.51 versus pounds 4.77...

  • QUIZ OF THE WEEK
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    1. Who is Marjorie Longdin's nephew, and why can he expect a more expensive than usual Christmas present from her? 2. Who is the odd one out: Matthew Parris, Geoff Boycott or Lauren Booth? 3. Who left his job amid allegations of curry making and kite...

  • QUOTES OF THE WEEK
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    Labour MP Rhodri Morgan, insisting that he will not back down from his fight to be leader of the new Welsh Assembly. Jurisprudence has been the perfect preparation for Tony Blair's career. It is well known to be a useless subject, full of high-soundi...

  • Letter: Briefly
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    Birt simply couldn't communicate with people who appreciated the values of the BBC. After ritual huffings and puffings, the Charter would have been renewed no matter who ran the show. Now the place is a shambles, with Birt and his sidekick, Sir Chris...

  • Letter: German intentions in 1914 are still far from clear
    Sunday, 15 November 1998

    In March 1918 the Germans imposed on the Bolsheviks the draconian Treaty of Brest-Litovsk. Its appallingly harsh terms were never implemented since the German army was defeated on the Western Front first. The same applied to the equally hideous Treat...

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