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Home 1998 December

Sunday, 6 December 1998

  • Letter: Uncool at college, unbearable now
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    I agree with Mark that Cambridge University, in many ways not yet fully meritocratic, is in need of reform. But his complaints that you had to be in bed by a certain time, that you had to wear a gown for dinner and hear Latin grace, and that you coul...

  • Letter: Right-wing socialists
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Lenin, like Hitler, accepted funds from big business, and it is not usually doubted that he was a socialist. As for genocide, everyone in Europe who advocated it in the last century and this called himself a socialist. Genocide was an exclusively soc...

  • May this spat mark the death-throes of privilege
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    But when it comes to the significance of last week's events for those of us who happen to be neither peers of the realm nor Labour spin-doctors, my sympathies and wishes for a speedy recovery are entirely with Mr Hague. He has suffered what I hope wi...

  • What if it's true, after all?
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Christmas is an uneasy, defiant time for the comfortable agnosticism of common British life. Some fudge it, and sing the carols for nostalgia and catharsis; more determined unbelievers prate about "cultural resonance" when caught sniffing sentimental...

  • Letter: Briefly
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    MIKE BLOXSOME Newport, South Wales

  • Quiz of the week
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    1. Who did Lord Sainsbury declare he wished to be Britain's ambassador for science and technology? 2. What is the alcohol content of absinthe, newly launched in Britain after a 70-year absence? At the turn of the century, what proportion of French as...

  • Letter: Briefly
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    CHRIS BRIGHT Editor, Jersey Evening Post

  • Hypocrisy over the immigrants
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Bravely, she pressed on with her mission, heading for, well, a department store. Where else would a serious economic migrant go? Within minutes she was the proud owner of a Steiff bear, a Lejaby bra, a set of Le Creuset casserole dishes, a microwave ...

  • It looks like the beginning of the end for Mr Hague
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    To the new prime minister, however, the departure of Salisbury amounted to the removal of "a very tiresome and inconvenient colleague". Macmillan had been much patronised before the war by assorted Cecils and Cavendishes - Tory grandees when the word...

  • Letter: Is there no better way?
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    The Designer Dog Kennels illustrated in your newspaper as a result of the competition may seem comfortable to someone who never knows while selling the Big Issue each day whether he or she will make enough money to pay for a hostel room at night or w...

  • Letter: Curbed cars? Dream on
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Walking to school represents a significant proportion of the distance walked by all children each year, making its contribution to their overall physical activity all the more important. As it is, today's inactive children are likely to become tomorr...

  • Letter: Let the clergy help break Irish deadlock
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    If this were to happen now, the clergy might help with a hand-over of IRA arms to the government of the Irish Republic. This would avoid the sensitive issue of Republicans handing arms to the British. And it would not be a case of the Catholic Church...

  • The agreeable world of Wallace Arnold: How the General got tetchy at the tricky third hole
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Excuse me. I do beg your pardon. Chin up, Wallace, calm down. Deep breath. All better. As I was saying, golf is the most marvellous game for unwinding. My life-long addiction to the game brought about my promotion last year to the position of Vice-Pr...

  • Leading Article: Animal wrongs
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    No one but an incorrigible sadist would wish to visit unnecessary suffering on animals, and there is no doubt that such suffering has been, and continues to be, visited upon them. The supporters of animal rights are therefore perfectly justified in d...

  • Letter: Gorey tale
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    RICHARD SADLER Chalfont St Giles, Bucks

  • Letter: Briefly
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    NICHOLAS LONG London SE6

  • Quotes of the week
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Peter Tatchell, defending his interruption of the Archbishop of Canterbury's sermon The Nazis could not have invaded Poland without General Motors. Bradford Snell, the historian, on collaborators in American business My wife certainly is not a sports...

  • Letter: Curbed cars? Dream on
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Plowden is a victim of spinning by John Prescott's Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions. In the summer, Prescott listed the 156 road schemes, costing some pounds 10,000m, which he had taken over from the Major administration. His ...

  • Letter: Stop protecting Pinochet
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Perhaps we should also consider whether someone who overthrows by force an existing government has the right to be regarded as a legitimate head of state. After all, in most countries, including our own, the leader of an attempted coup which failed w...

  • Letter: Tired old rhetoric, Lord Irvine
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    The involvement of some of the county court judiciary in local political mafias, the appetite for promotion of the lower order judges, as well as the higher, in a hierarchical system, the longstanding palliness of judges with senior silks, of revenue...

  • Profile: Jack Straw - The man who will send Pinochet home
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    Hatred of Pinochet was a sacred cause for left-wingers during the 1970s. "El pueblo unido, jams ser vencido," we used to chant outside some embassy or other, tears visibly running down our faces as we lit candles and sang songs about Victor Jara's ha...

  • Lord Cranborne's reward for doing his duty was the sack
    Sunday, 6 December 1998

    In 1587, when the Queen was finally persuaded, against her inclinations, to sign the warrant for the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, William Cecil, Lord Burghley, persuaded the Council to send off the warrant, and not to tell the Queen until after...

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