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Home 1998 February

Wednesday, 4 February 1998

  • War could come closer to home than Iraq
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    At this point, readers may already be throwing up their hands. A UN plan (or to put it in the curious jargon of Cyprus peacemaking, a "non-plan" complete with "non-maps") has been around since 1992. It provides for a bi-zonal, bi-communal federation ...

  • Letter: Nigerian crime wave
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    It has become a pastime for the press to make Nigeria a scapegoat for the inability of the system to check rampant sharp practice (" sweeps through Britain", 2 February). Nigeria has a sophisticated array of professionals in virtually all areas of Br...

  • Letter: Freedom to B flat
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    After taking part in the world premiere (probably also the world derniere) of an avant-garde orchestral composition, a well-known clarinettist realised that he had, quite by accident, played the entire piece on his A clarinet rather than the B flat i...

  • Letter: Amnesty for pigs
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    Paul Vallely ("How the flying pigs became a crackling good tale", 17 January) claims that in the 1970s "Amnesty International financed experiments to torture pigs to find out whether certain kinds of torture could be used without damaging skin" and s...

  • Letter: Artful arguments
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    Unfortunately, in his vigorous campaign to support Greenwich Theatre, Matthew Francis (letter, 2 February) has missed the main point of Trevor Phillips' article (24 January). Far from telling arts practitioners not to bother to argue for increased fu...

  • `Oops - Sorry I Forgot Your Sad Suicide' ... and other greetings cards the censor saw
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    Number 29: A taste controller in the greetings card industry "Up to the 1960s, nobody ever saw the slightest need for taste control in the greetings card industry," says Horace Liveright. "That's because everything was tasteful. Ghastly good taste, y...

  • Who will be next ball out in the Great Regulators' Lottery?
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    For it was Thatcher who, without reflection, created the new breed of regulators, largely unaccountable to either Whitehall or Parliament, untrained, amateur, working with minimal job descriptions and without performance appraisal. That some of them ...

  • My barmy relations ... and that photograph of the naked Kate Moss
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    "Memory loss? Confusion? Periodic forgetfulness?" it runs (I paraphrase, but not much). "If you know of a loved one who suffers from any of these, why not put their name forward to take part in clinical trials. You could even find yourself remunerate...

  • Letter: Lottery regulator
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    While one would agree with the comments in your leading article "The jury's verdict damned the lottery regulator, too" (3 February), there is another aspect of the situation which must be remedied. The obligations of the regulator to maximise revenue...

  • Leading Article: A vote and voice for every British citizen - not just here but overseas too
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    The Dependent Territories, a clutch of far-flung possessions strung across the globe, are the last morsels of the empire which Britain bit off and then spat out over the course of four centuries. Most are islands, the remnants of a naval strategy tha...

  • Letter: President of the UK
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    LAWRENCE KILKENNY Stafford

  • Letter: The first black peer?
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    It was good to read the article "Not them, not us, just here" (ISM, 31 January). You describe Lord Taylor of Warwick, however, as the "first black peer". I applaud his achievement, but you've clearly forgotten the late Lord Pitt of Hampstead, while B...

  • Letter: Freedom to B flat
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    Since the dawn of orchestral music, composers have always been held back from writing exactly as they wished, by those that commissioned and consumed the symphonies, sonatas and concertos. Music in any tradition has long been governed by what those p...

  • Letter: President of the UK
    Thursday, 5 February 1998

    The germ of the answer to Andreas Whittam Smith's problem in finding a credible president is to be found within his own article ("Why I lost the debate over the monarchy", 3 February). He raised the question as to who best represented the mood of the...

  • Letter: All in the mind
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    On retirement off the coast of British Columbia, she joined the local yacht club to learn navigation. When the class was assigned exercises, the other potential yachtspersons complained that "that lady" always solved all the problems in her head. IAN...

  • Letter: Thanks to Europe
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    EU-based firms have responded by drawing attention to the national provenance of their products or the brand name. Audi has a sensationally effective "this car is German" message ("Vorsprung durch Technik"). VW has made a virtue of Germanic obsession...

  • Letter: Quick cash
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    ANDREW A JEFFREY Roade, Northamptonshire

  • Letter: A mongrel language
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    And once children have learned to read only the new code, try getting them to take an interest in the 600 years of English literature which will all suddenly look archaic. Or will they just scroll up a few controversially re-spelt Internet versions? ...

  • In search of that big idea: Bill or Tony: which one will history remember?
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    It might seem a little startling to have a top US columnist suggest that Thatcher was more important than Reagan: the latter did after all "win" the Cold War. But if you try and tie down the personal element of the achievement and the influence proje...

  • Leading Article: What Clinton can tell Blair about Murdoch, the titanic tax avoider
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    As for Britain, Murdoch is a man to whom a Labour prime minister opens the doors of Downing Street, the potentate to whom, mysteriously, party policies on concentrations of power and competition are not to be applied. So will Messrs Blair and Clinton...

  • The greatest story ever told - again, and this time, no one gets nailed to a cross
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    To allay fears about the Disney treatment of a Bible story, Disney executives have been giving interviews to selected members of the press, and I was lucky enough to have five minutes with Ralph J Kleinmut, who is Chief Disney Jesus Story Co-ordinato...

  • Unwanted house guests: Paddy Ashdown killed my guinea pig ...
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    Now everyone has heard that this government's imperative is to get as many people off benefits as possible. And presumably this is their latest secret weapon in welfare-to-work: get off the dole or we're sending Paddy round to stay. (Certainly it's l...

  • Letter: Saving the planet
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    It is certainly an ambitious undertaking, but attainable. However, public support for such a target may be more forthcoming if the spotlight shifts from global warming to things that more directly and immediately concern us. For example, with 8 milli...

  • In the death chamber: So Texas thinks this is a humane substitute for the electric chair?
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    The gurney is the only piece of furniture in the death chamber in the Walls Unit of the Texas Department of Corrections prison. To the side is a window like that of the control booth in a TV studio. Karla Tucker nominated five people to watch her die...

  • Letter: Drink-drive laws
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    Often my pint of coke is only a few pence cheaper than my husband's pint of beer. The price of a pint of beer is inflated by the taxation levied upon it - why does my soft drink cost about the same amount?

  • Letter: Anti-culture club
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    Imagine if there was only one publisher of new literary fiction in the entire country. That is the relation a composer has to Radio 3. In this realm, Radio 3 is an absolute totalitarian state. It is an utter anomaly in the multi-media age.

  • Letter: You show me yours
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    PAUL O'HANLON Runcorn, Cheshire

  • Letter: Drink-drive laws
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    Most people who stop for a drink leave after two pints. I do it, as do many of my friends. We're not drunks, fiends, or killers of children on zebra crossings, and after two pints we obey every cat's-eye. We actually drive more carefully after two pi...

  • Letter: Anti-culture club
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    It is a myth that very few people want to hear contemporary art music. The problem is that the people who don't want to hear it are the ones who have the most disposable income, the most free time, and the loudest voices. If there is a dictatorship o...

  • Letter: Thanks to Europe
    Wednesday, 4 February 1998

    I too vividly remember crossing the Channel, into a country in which it was impossible to get a decent meal in whole counties, because even if the ingredients were available, nobody knew what to do with them. A land where women left church early to p...

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