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Home 1998 March

Tuesday, 3 March 1998

  • Germans glimpse life after Kohl and feel the thrill of change
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    On Sunday Schroder confounded the Cassandras, emerging with renewed strength from the fight considered the most difficult of his long campaign.Bild, the country's biggest tabloid, has unceremoniously ditched the Chancellor and appointed itself cheer-...

  • At last! You can be at the very heart of the media circus!
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    Last week we guaranteed to have someone carrying the placard of your choice on the Countryside March! (The winner was THE AMERICAN GUN LOBBY SUPPORTS PETER MANDELSON'S DOMES) The week before that we guaranteed that Janet Street-Porter would walk thro...

  • Letter: Dome thoughts
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    The Rev ALEC McGUIRE Leeds

  • Letter: BBC in Parliament
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    You are right to stress that covering Parliament is part of the BBC's public service remit. We welcome that. But the real public service challenge is to engage new audiences in what is going on in Parliament. That is why we have spent many months tal...

  • Letter: Speaking for the IRA
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    If one of the principal objectives of the peace talks is to bring the cycle of violence to an end, and if Sinn Fein now say that they should not be confused with the IRA, how can there be any reliable prospect of the IRA ceasing violence even if the ...

  • Murdoch's media empire is global and mighty, but it isn't eternal
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    This is a pity because behind the fuss lies a crucial question. Will, during the first half of the next century, the power of the global media become more concentrated or more diffuse? There is also a more specific issue: is Mr Murdoch's attempt to a...

  • Leading Article: Even Gates must play by the rules
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    The gist of a judgment last December by a federal judge was that the inclusion in the product of Microsoft's own "browser" for the Internet is seriously harming the capacity of other software companies to compete. To defend his company and its strate...

  • Letter: Autism and MMR jab
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    I quite agree that measles is a killer and no one wishes to see a return of this disease but, I, for one, would not have given my son the combined MMR vaccine if I had been aware that there was any chance of him becoming autistic. My "normal" develop...

  • Leading Article: Tycoon who taints news
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    As the full extent of Rupert Murdoch's engagement with the Chinese regime becomes clear, so does his profligacy with his newspapers' capacity to inspire that trust. His editors take his shilling and dance to his tune, wiggling their hips to entertain...

  • Letter: Princess's play
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    Alan Jefferson directed the play, which was presented by Judy Montagu, Billy Wallace and Anthony Berry at the Scala Theatre, Charlotte Street, London W1, on 1, 2 and 3 June, 1954, in aid of the Invalid Children's Aid Association. Princess Margaret ga...

  • Letter: End of farming?
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    J E LAMPER Wareham, Dorset

  • New Labour is old at heart. It's no place for the young
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    Welfare to work, tuition fees and failure to attack the creativity brain drain of young designers away from Britain have led me to speak out against a Government which was voted in with fervour by a disillusioned youth and has now turned against thos...

  • Letter: End of farming?
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    An increasingly global food market, the effects of BSE and the likely reduction or removal of hill-farming subsidies will put many farmers out of business. After the markets for rural retreats, golf courses, paint- balling, off-roading and holiday vi...

  • Letter: End of farming?
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    I am a "townie" through and through, and probably do find it difficult to understand some of the problems affecting the countryside. However, I would have thought that my genuine sympathy and concern for their plight must be worth more than the wealt...

  • Letter: Modern Latin
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    But if we can invent a Euro-currency, why not a Euro-language: a modernised, grammar-pruned, phonetic, gender-free Latin - learning shrewdly from the well-intentioned failures of Esperanto - which would be as syntactically easy as English, as phoneti...

  • The Box
    Wednesday, 4 March 1998

    FORTUNATELY, the Prime Minister did not attend the first Commons meeting of Friends of Oxford University Labour Club on Monday night. He might have overhead an exchange which would have left him doubly depressed. Austin Mitchell gave a speech to this...

  • Leading Article: Mean city streets to let
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    And yet maybe Kirklees' example does have something to offer other public services . Most could be marketed much more effectively. Wouldn't it be refreshing - however unlikely it may be - to have the National Health Service inviting the public in to ...

  • Leading Article: Sex pests mean bad managers
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    Sexual attraction happens in the workplace; but is not and never can be an excuse for abuse of power. If men are allowed to get away with it, that speaks of a massive failure of managerial process. Sexual harassment is an organisational pathology whi...

  • John Major gives serious thought to resigning on a point of principle
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    So you can imagine how relieved I was when he rang me back yesterday to discuss the matter. "If I refuse to do the book for HarperCollins," he said, "will I have to hand the advance back?" "Yes, I'm afraid so." "That is quite normal?" "Well, it's not...

  • Letter: BBC for schools
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    "Dry and formal" may be Sally Williams's verdict on BBC Education's radio output. It's certainly not the verdict of the teachers and children who listen to it. Audiences are increasing. ALAN LAMBERT Commissioning Editor, BBC Education GEOFF MARSHALL-...

  • Letter: Lottery children
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    Although it is illegal for children to buy tickets, they have been involved in the promotion of the lottery, from its inception. Thus, children appeared in the initial television advertisements and were in the studio audience of the live draw, which ...

  • Letter: Chess education
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    Young offenders should be given chess tuition. It would teach them to be aware of the consequences of their actions, and channel their aggression into a mind sport. TONY BLADES Birkenhead, Merseyside

  • Call me unfashionable, but Harriet deserves an even break
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    Judged by such deeply unscientific criteria, Harriet Harman isn't exactly up. The latest charge against her is that she has been leaking budget information - a charge which can be levelled more widely than at Ms Harman. The Treasury itself has adopte...

  • The BBC is a public service. And that means not faking integrity
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    Yet an accumulation of incidents is beginning to make me wonder whether the public service ethos of the BBC is less pervasive than it appears. For example there is the recent decision to move daily coverage of Parliament into what Gerald Kaufman has ...

  • Letter: Blowing the whistle
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    First, for the very reasons Dr Slapper sets out in his letter, the law will provide for reinstatement. Indeed, because whistle-blowers are so vulnerable, the Government has agreed to extend to them the special provisions for reinstatement pending the...

  • Letter: Lingua franca
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    As you point out, national rivalry will preclude the adoption of any modern language. The logical candidate is Latin, which was in fact used for this very purpose in the Middle Ages. Modern technological terms would pose no problem, since most of the...

  • Letter: Henry the Forgotten
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    No. Henry would not have been king. The throne would have gone to his elder sister Margaret Tudor (born 1489), who married James IV of Scotland. Their granddaughter was Mary, Queen of Scots. SHEILA M LYONS Chichester, West Sussex

  • I thought Bathos was a cut-price holiday destination
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    The cut-price carrier easyJet has served a writ against British Airways, claiming that it is cross-subsidising Go, its new low-price airline and that the tactic is intended to put easyJet out of business. Cross-subsidy is the established company's we...

  • Letter: Countryside myth
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    Westminster politicians could then concentrate on ensuring that the nation as a whole benefited from future subsidies paid to farmers. If the public wants to retain small fields and their hedges, which, as Roger Stratton (letter, 28 February) implies...

  • Letter: Countryside myth
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    I don't hunt, but I am clear about my own motives for making the long journey from Northumberland to London. Hunting is the cultural tradition of a decent minority group, and the Bill to ban it symbolises the populist bigotry of this government, with...

  • The Box
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    No doubt you've heard of Julian Lennon and, now, Jakob Dylan. But did you know that Sean Lennon, 22, the only son of John and Yoko, has an album being released in May? Or that Adam Cohen, the 25- year-old son of the melancholic Canadian poet/crooner ...

  • Letter: Countryside myth
    Tuesday, 3 March 1998

    In many rural areas the social cohesion essential to the maintenance of shops and services is undermined by people who are absent in towns during the day. House prices soar, and those who actually need to live and work in the countryside are driven f...

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