The Independent | Archive
Home 1998 May

Saturday, 2 May 1998

  • I never imagined I'd find myself feeling sorry for lawyers
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    This, at least, is what we were supposed to think. The men and women in question turned out to be the barristers and solicitors who earned most from legal aid in 1996-7 and the Lord Chancellor, Lord Irvine, said his decision to authorise publication ...

  • Profile: A sharp-clawed pussycat: Craig Brown
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    One assumes that Mr Mandelson's breakfast was not unduly disturbed by the threat of Harry Enfield's "full force". His last encounter with the television comedian was at a Labour drinks party in November, when a somewhat tired and emotional Enfield re...

  • Leading article: A harsh truth for Hague
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    It is, however, an historical fact that a generally feeble display in the Commons is not such a great problem. All of the Conservatives' periods in opposition since the war have been accompanied by lame parliamentary performances, especially in the f...

  • Goodbye to the B-flat brigade, and good riddance
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    Personally, I've loved the classics ever since I first heard The Black and White Minstrel Show many moons ago. But I believed then, as I believe now, that too much prominence in the Classical Canon is given to what one might call the Gloomies - those...

  • Let's dare to admit that our present way of voting delivered the goods
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    The power of the painting lies in the way it makes Judgement Day intrude into the physical world of opulence, food and human company. Fate cannot be staved off or mitigated: hence Belshazzar's stricken terror. I thought of that moment when, in one of...

  • 'Ere we go, putting the boot in again
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    There is a shortage of tickets for England and Scotland fans for France 98. That is, undoubtedly, one of the great humanitarian disasters of our time. (There is also a shortage for Dutch, Belgian, Italian, German and French - yes, French - fans but w...

  • Can you forgive them?
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    "In 1968 she killed two small boys," I began. "But that was 30 years ago. And she was a child herself at the time, wasn't she?" "Yes, she was 11." "And she served a sentence for manslaughter." "Yes, 12 years." "And she's lived peacefully since being ...

  • A farewell bash for the boys
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    The champagne flowed like ... well, champagne, so it must have cost a pretty penny. It seems that the taxpayer will foot the bill, because the invitations bore the official government hospitality crest and the personal imprimatur of the Prime Ministe...

  • Writers must tell the truth, not spare us pain
    Sunday, 3 May 1998

    The papers would almost certainly have behaved as they did anyway. They did not need the support of Mr Jack Straw and Mr Tony Blair. But these ministers clearly did not act as a restraining influence: if anything, the reverse. Mr Blair said - during ...

  • Beware politicians on the Internet, as they find forms of manipulation
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    This week, the efforts of Messrs Hague and Blair to top one another in the realm of cyberspace democracy were worthy but should not be repeated unless and until everyone has had some lessons. Mr Blairs' unfamiliarity with a keyboard was manifest; his...

  • The downside of the pill that's billed as an up
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    Viagra certainly appears to have a vroom,vroom effect, boosting manly vigour and self-image. It has even achieved the ultimate American accolade - top billing on the cover of Time magazine. It is clearly the answer to Pfizer's prayers, the pharmaceut...

  • Jarvis Cocker's mum is a Tory - and he will be one, too
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    Jarvis, it transpires, was also a Cub Scout, who passed some of his tenderest years in saluting the flag, singing hymns and collecting badges for various arcane skills involving string. Mum, a pillar of society clearly, is not only a Tory but will - ...

  • Letter: Surgeons no fat cats
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    TIMOTHY RAGGATT QC believes that his taxable income of pounds 190,000 is the same as a consultant surgeon ("Top lawyers get pounds 500,000 a year from legal aid", 29 April). He is seriously wrong. The NHS salary of a consultant is a maximum of pounds...

  • Letter: Protecting Venice
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    MICHAEL McCARTHY'S report (21 April) highlighted the threat of catastrophic flooding facing Venice. For nearly two years I chaired the international panel of experts that supervised the preparation of the environmental impact statement for the propos...

  • Letter: Hear Mary Bell's cry
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    IN YOUR leading article about Mary Bell (30 April) you state "We have learned nothing from the book that would stop such crimes happening." This is not the case. If people who have been similarly abused read Gitta Sereny's book or excepts they will r...

  • Letter: Flag upside-down
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    IT'S NOT a myth that our national flag hung upside down is a recognised distress signal (letter 28 April). However, I've only ever seen it referred to in a marine context. British-registered ships fly not a full-scale Union Flag, but a monocolour ens...

  • Letter: Gays and the church
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    The word translated "abominations" in Leviticus 18 does not only deal with matters of ritual impurity but also with moral evil. The same word is used to describe child sacrifice and idolatry in Deuteronomy 18. The teaching an sexual morality in Levit...

  • Letter: Algeria's agony
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    ROBERT FISK draws attention to the danger in Algeria of civilians armed and supported by the state ("Militias implicated in Algeria's reign of terror", 23 April). Recent atrocious massacres appear to have woken the international community to the appa...

  • Letter: 'Real' nappies
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    I AM going to have a baby in October (all going well) and find myself in the midst of a baby boom among friends. I have been seriously considering not using disposable nappies. There seem to be some great alternatives about, which don't add to the la...

  • Letter: Beef-on-the-bone peril
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    Dairy cows receive antibiotics when there is a need to treat illness, for example mastitis, and this is done under veterinary supervision. By law, milk produced by treated cows must be withheld from the bulk supply for an appropriate length of time t...

  • Leading Article: Mary Bell: time to step back
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    Mary Bell has already given her name to a part of common law, the so- called "Mary Bell order", which prevents the identification of a child, in her case, her child, now that she has changed her name. Now the Prime Minister, the Home Secretary and th...

  • Leading Article: Black-cool irony
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    The Prime Minister is also to blame, kiss-me-quick hats and black pudding being deemed too Old Britannia for New Labour. "Suddenly they're too posh to come to Blackpool when they get power," Miss Thompson laments bitterly. But Blackpool is fighting b...

  • Quote unquote
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    "Doing Blair was definitely difficult at first, but he is getting so messianic now it is a lot easier." - Rory Bremner, impressionist. "A drunk man is more likely to find a woman attractive. So, if all else fails, get him drunk." - Dr Patrick McGhee,...

  • Letter: Gays and the church
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    DENNIS WRIGLEY Community Leader Maranatha Community Manchester

  • Letter: Beef-on-the-bone peril
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    JACK CUNNINGHAM was absolutely right to protect the public from the dangers of BSE-infected bone marrow. It is most unfortunate that the powerful meat and farming lobbies are attempting to overturn this wise precaution ("Farmers hail court ruling ove...

  • Letter: Gays and the church
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    THE REV Guy Davies (letter, 28 April) opposes homosexual behaviour, but fails to admit the existence of homosexual people. I spent over 30 years trying to make myself fit the Church's traditional framework of sexual teaching and the more I tried, the...

  • Letter: Gays and the church
    Saturday, 2 May 1998

    Being cowed by the "second marriage" lobby is possibly a lot more popular among church members, and sitting in the pews with serial adulterers a lot less uncomfortable than letting in gays. ROBERT SENECAL London EC1

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Customer Service Advisor

£15000 - £16000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Customer Service Advisor is r...

Recruitment Genius: Plant Fitter - Construction Industry

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This well established construction equipment d...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Uncapped Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitm...

Recruitment Genius: Factory Operatives

£7 - £8 per hour: Recruitment Genius: This high quality thread manufacturer ba...

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003