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Tuesday, 26 November 2002

  • First in
    Wednesday, 27 November 2002

    It doesn't quite match up to the relief of Mafeking in 1900 or even the attempted seizure of Baghdad in 1915 (actually, that failed with the loss of more than 50,000 lives – but we don't like to dicuss it at the moment), but John Simpson's liberation...

  • The lessons to be learnt from these worrying failures in the classroom
    Wednesday, 27 November 2002

    Tony Blair's oft-repeated mantra that "education, education and education" were his top three priorities was never supposed to herald a fall in reading standards in primary schools four years after Labour swept to power in 1997. Yet this is precise...

  • A better deal is needed for London's public workers
    Wednesday, 27 November 2002

    The Trade Union would be the last people to admit it, at least publicly, but the best service they could perform for their members would be to press for the break-up of the national pay bargaining structures that so dominate the landscape of public-...

  • Jeremy Laurance: Poor countries need their nurses more than we do
    Wednesday, 27 November 2002

    What can be madder than this? Britain is donating £70m a year in the form of international aid to a southern African country on the verge of starvation while at the same time it is stripping it of its most precious resource – skilled nurses.Malawi t...

  • Steve Connor: The primate paradox that makes experiments on monkeys both necessary and controversial
    Wednesday, 27 November 2002

    At the heart of the debate over using monkeys in scientific research is the primate paradox: their closeness to humans makes them the ideal experimental model for the study of the brain, yet because they look so much like us, they also appear to fe...

  • It's time to reform the sex laws and our minds
    Wednesday, 27 November 2002

    If you visit the website of the company "Complete Excellence", based somewhere in Dorset, you will be invited to buy something more exotic than country crafts. Jilly and Mike, you soon discover, "are happy to welcome you to their quiet, discreet...

  • Alan Miles: Tony Blair has inflamed our dispute
    Wednesday, 27 November 2002

    I stood on the picket line on Monday with my colleagues from the Red Watch at West Hampstead Fire Station, and waited eagerly for Tony Blair to address the nation.We watched a man with an odd look in his eyes, a look of a man who perhaps knew he wou...

  • Class act
    Tuesday, 26 November 2002

    For those of us who queued three or four hours to get tickets to see Simon Russell Beale at the London's Donmar Theatre and still failed to get any, it's little consolation to know that he has gained the Evening Standard award for best actor and Sa...

  • The far-right threat has receded, but we must not ignore the lessons of history
    Tuesday, 26 November 2002

    Almost three years after it became the first nation in Europe to vote a neo-fascist party into power, the voters of Austria have now, seemingly, reversed this trend. True, the world will have to see whether the country's system of proportional repre...

  • Mr Blair and his sluggish response to an emergency
    Tuesday, 26 November 2002

    What if Tony Blair had made a few weeks ago the remarks on the fire strike that he uttered yesterday? It is difficult to suppose that they would have prevented industrial action. Indeed, Mr Blair's tough-sounding stance might have provoked the fir...

  • Virginia Ironside: I understand her parents' stance, but horror tactics will almost certainly fail
    Tuesday, 26 November 2002

    It's understandable that the parents of poor Rachel Whitear feel a desperate need to do something. They want to feel that if a video of her life, unveiled yesterday at John Masefield School in Ledbury, Herefordshire, will save just one other teenager...

  • Jenny Diski: My first fashion statement
    Tuesday, 26 November 2002

    In spite of the Victoria and Albert Museum's Versace festival, and books such as Fashion Statements: the Archaeology of Elegance, I've never been convinced by the idea of fashion as art. I don't see why it has to be; it has so much else to do. When c...

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Day In a Page

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

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Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

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Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

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Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

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Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

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The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

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Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

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Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape