The Independent | Archive
Home 2002 December

Saturday, 28 December 2002

  • Rowan Pelling: Ghosts and ghouls at New Year
    Sunday, 29 December 2002

    I never see New Year as a time for riotous celebration. By the close of Boxing Day, I've had my fix of bonhomie. The Merry Gentlemen are rested and it's time for something darker. As we approach Twelfth Night, it is easier to sense the echoes from pa...

  • Let's go to war on poor schools and hospitals
    Sunday, 29 December 2002

    The year is ending with the shadow of war hanging over us all, memories of terrorist atrocities in Bali and Mombasa still fresh, and new fears about North Korea's weapons of mass destruction. Yet now is the moment when instinctively we feel we should...

  • Edward Heath: The fanatics in the Conservative Party risk everything we have gained
    Sunday, 29 December 2002

    It is now more than 30 years since I steered this country towards membership of the European Economic Community (EEC), as it was then called. I look back with great pleasure and nostalgia at my proudest political achievement. However, I do so wit...

  • Alexi Sayle: The best soldiers are frightened of everything
    Saturday, 28 December 2002

    Channel 4 showed a documentary on Christmas night about Derek and Clive, the foul-mouthed alter egos of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore who emerged in a series of improvised tapings in the late Seventies and early Eighties, before I was in showbusine...

  • Charlie Courtauld: Is this the world's least imaginative man? I'll bet you £200m that he is
    Saturday, 28 December 2002

    It won't change his life, he insists. He'll still be up at 5am every day, will drive to work and put in a full day at the office. Perhaps he'll invest in that chopper he's always fancied, maybe some tithes to his church, but otherwise Jack Whittaker ...

  • Kenya's Big Man must answer for the catastrophe that has befallen his country
    Saturday, 28 December 2002

    It was a delicious, if mildly terrifying moment. The time is five years ago and the place is the veranda of the Norfolk Hotel, in Nairobi. The elections which will see the end of his rule are still a long way away. Daniel Arap Moi is the undisputed ...

  • A C Grayling: We should not let baby Eve tempt us away from progress
    Saturday, 28 December 2002

    Of all the advances made in recent years by medical applications of genetics, the one that has promised most controversy is the cloning of human beings. Troubled debate about the prospect of such a development was sparked when the Italian doctor Sev...

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine