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Tuesday, 28 May 2002

  • A saga of misplaced loyalties, weakness and incompetence
    Wednesday, 29 May 2002

    The resignation of Stephen Byers, the Secretary of State for Transport, was, like too many trains on the British railways, long overdue. Had he resigned in the immediate aftermath of the row about his special adviser, Jo Moore, he would have left w...

  • Own goal
    Wednesday, 29 May 2002

    The most senior paid official of Fifa, world football's governing body, has submitted to a Swiss court a 300-page document alleging financial misconduct involving its president, Sepp Blatter. Five of Fifa's seven vice-presidents have backed a legal...

  • This verdict makes perfect legal and political sense
    Wednesday, 29 May 2002

    One of the key principles of Anglo-Saxon law is the separation of powers among the legislature, the executive and the judiciary. In theory, Parliament makes the laws, the Home Secretary enforces them and the judiciary decides whether they have been v...

  • Josie Appleton: Distorted priorities are destroying local museums
    Wednesday, 29 May 2002

    Leading British painters and sculptors, including Antony Gormley and David Hockney, have written to Chancellor Gordon Brown asking for more money to revive local museums and galleries. Local museums and galleries, they say, were vital to their d...

  • Trevor Phillips: Diversity is integral to London's very nature - and its past and present success
    Wednesday, 29 May 2002

    It is not only an honour, but also a pleasure to be awarded a degree of this university. You are a forgiving bunch, I must say. My first experiences of this university were helping to organise student occupations as part of the NUS campaign against o...

  • Very Cross in Mersey
    Wednesday, 29 May 2002

    Liverpool has outlived its usefulness as a city, and I think most people in Britain would just wish it would go away." That's what Linda Grant said on Newsnight the other night, and she is certainly right as far as its usefulness as a port is co...

  • Absent friends
    Tuesday, 28 May 2002

    Internal linksFriendsReunited website goes global We all know that the British, being the most dysfunctional nation in Europe, live in a perpetual world of their schooldays. Hence the success of Friends Reunited, the website that brings schoolfriend...

  • Pakistan has failed to offer even the tiniest olive branch
    Tuesday, 28 May 2002

    With the world's two newest nuclear powers on the brink of all-out war over Kashmir, yesterday's broadcast by the President of Pakistan had been keenly awaited. But the four-star general, who has risen so convincingly to a succession of crises sinc...

  • Tim Luckhurst: The Queen loves Scotland, but do the Scots love her?
    Tuesday, 28 May 2002

    Her Majesty is a very nice girl, but she doesn't have a lot to say. We have that on the authority of Paul McCartney, who, unusually among those who write about her, had actually met the lady. Scotland then has a peculiar effect on the regal tong...

  • Show no mercy to feckless parents
    Tuesday, 28 May 2002

    I am against capital punishment, the birch, smacking infants, the live transportation of animals and "getting tough" with asylum-seekers. I also cry when children or dogs die in movies. There are few people more soft-hearted than I. But the week...

  • Steve Connor: We're desperate to believe that there is life on Mars
    Tuesday, 28 May 2002

    What we want to see and what we actually see tend to be different concepts when it comes to looking at Mars. The Red Planet has had such a hold on the popular imagination that we seize upon almost any new fact as further evidence of Martian life...

  • Paddy Ashdown: Bosnia has a choice: prosperity or conflict
    Tuesday, 28 May 2002

    It's great to be back. And a great honour to be taking over from my distinguished predecessor, Wolfgang Petritsch. He has left us with a foundation to build on and, with your help, I intend to build on it.My wife Jane and I are really looking forwar...

  • Here we go again: it's time to play the sordid game of who's up, who's down
    Tuesday, 28 May 2002

    It was brave – if a little unwise – of Patricia Hewitt, the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, to complain that she is working too hard, putting in over 70 hours a week for her £117,979 salary. She suggests that ministerial jobs should b...

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Day In a Page

Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

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Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

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Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

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Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

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Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

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Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

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King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

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Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

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Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

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60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones