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Tuesday, 4 June 2002

  • A celebration that has left Britain a little less cynical and a lot more cheerful
    Wednesday, 5 June 2002

    Britain returns to work today after an unprecedented four days of celebration and pageantry that marked not only the golden jubilee of the Queen, but a reaffirmation of our nationhood. Whatever misgivings we may harbour about the institution of the m...

  • Jenny Jones: If we have memorials to rail crashes, why not to the dead on the roads?
    Wednesday, 5 June 2002

    The monument to commemorate road crash victims is one of London's missing landmarks. The absence speaks volumes about the emotional bypass that justifies our choice of cars over people and metal over flesh.We have numerous statues to the British ...

  • Own goal
    Tuesday, 4 June 2002

    It is a strange perversion of the free market when fans pay black-market prices for World Cup tickets, while the team they have travelled half way round the world to support plays to a half-empty stadium. Supporters may not buy the spare tickets lega...

  • Now that he has seen Africa, Paul O'Neill should act on aid
    Tuesday, 4 June 2002

    Paul O'Neill was back at work at the US Treasury yesterday after visiting some of the poorest countries in Africa in his bizarre 10-day double-act with Bono. He is said to be planning a period of reflection before presenting any recommendations to...

  • Amid the celebrations, it is never wise to forget Northern Ireland
    Tuesday, 4 June 2002

    Much of the country has spent the past three days cheerfully wrapped in one flag or other, enjoying the first flush of warm weather, the spectacle of the Queen's jubilee celebrations, or a breakfast-time pint while viewing the World Cup. One corner o...

  • Kathy Marks: Australia marches backwards on its Aborigine rights
    Tuesday, 4 June 2002

    Ten years ago yesterday, the High Court in Australia handed down a long-awaited judgement with momentous implications. Ruling in a case brought by a fisherman called Eddie Mabo, it rejected the doctrine of terra nullius – the idea that the contine...

  • Roald Hoffman: Dry science needs to recover a sense of the emotional
    Tuesday, 4 June 2002

    There was chemistry before the chemical journal. The new was described in books, in pamphlets or broadsides, in letters to secretaries of scientific societies. These societies, for instance the Royal Society in London, chartered in 1662, or the A...

  • Without e-mail how would I have an inner life?
    Tuesday, 4 June 2002

    An e-mail arrives, addressed to me personally. It comes, it tells me proudly, "from the desk of Dr James Gorii" and begins: "It is with my profound dignity that I write you this very important and highly confidential letter." Dr Gorii, it seems, is l...

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