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Thursday, 11 July 2002

  • Crash. Bang. Wallop
    Friday, 12 July 2002

    As prangs go, Commander Richard Farrington's little adventure with HMS Nottingham is impressive. The destroyer has several holes in its hull after hitting Wolfe Rock near Lord Howe Island in the south Pacific. Although Commander Farrington was not ...

  • The Interbrew case: the principle at stake goes to the heart of a free press
    Friday, 12 July 2002

    Journalism might often seem a frivolous or irresponsible business. Sometimes it is, and sometimes it ought to be. But behind all the froth, the scandal and the entertainment, it is also a serious enterprise. We all know, even if it is not at the f...

  • University students should pay for their own education
    Friday, 12 July 2002

    The Prime Minster was so surprised by the strength of middle-class outrage at the partial withdrawal of the perk of free university education that he did what he always does in a tight spot. He ordered a review. That led to expectations, stoked by ...

  • Mary Dejevsky: We Europeans should claim our bragging rights
    Friday, 12 July 2002

    A more potent image of the crisis that has engulfed the US economy since the Enron scandal would be hard to find than the television footage of President Bush addressing Wall Street financiers as the Dow Jones indicator ticked ever lower in the ...

  • Abortion. Drugs. Gays. Transsexuals. We're not a progressive nation, are we?
    Friday, 12 July 2002

    Here's one that David Blunkett does not need to agonise over. Yesterday the European Court of Human Rights, in Strasbourg, upheld Christine Goodwin's right to be a woman. The judges unanimously ruled that her country – Britain – had breached her...

  • Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma: The renewal of Africa belongs to this generation
    Friday, 12 July 2002

    We are meeting at a critical juncture in the history of our continent. We are poised for the new beginning. Our primary responsibility as the elected representatives of our people is to look at how far we have come and to prepare for the long and ard...

  • Paul Vallely: The subversive dynamism of market forces
    Friday, 12 July 2002

    A fairly typical bundle of post landed on the mat this morning. A hospital appointment for our two year old, 10 days hence. A phone bill. A change of address card. A postcard from holidaying friends. A newsletter from a pressure group. Two charity ap...

  • The war may be over, but Mr Blunkett has become confused about drugs
    Thursday, 11 July 2002

    Cannabis is by far the most commonly used illegal recreational drug in Britain; indeed, it is probably less harmful than tobacco or alcohol. The grounds for believing it provides a "gateway" to harder drugs are, at best, anecdotal. There is litt...

  • A brave attempt to further the cause of prison reform
    Thursday, 11 July 2002

    Penal reform has always been a Cinderella cause in this country, and those who campaign against the appalling conditions that all too often obtain in our jails have to struggle to be heard. So it is all the more encouraging that Cherie Blair has...

  • On tap
    Thursday, 11 July 2002

    Still or sparkling? Either way, bottled water has always been an expensive way of rehydrating. Of course, in some countries, the ones where, in the old phrase, "you can't drink the water", such a luxury was a necessity. In Britain, despite its fine V...

  • Labour may be preparing its own poll tax disaster
    Thursday, 11 July 2002

    Last December I warned here that "Buried in the small print is the intention to abolish the standard spending assessment (SSA). This is the formula that is used to decide the level of grant to councils from the Government. Most MPs think it is unf...

  • Cherie Booth QC: What I was told by a drug pusher
    Thursday, 11 July 2002

    I'm delighted to be here. Delighted to have the opportunity to give this first Lord Longford memorial lecture. I am particularly pleased to have been able to renew my acquaintance with Lady Longford . She is of course a notable women in her own r...

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