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Friday, 9 August 2002

  • The beginning of the end for Zimbabwe's white citizens
    Saturday, 10 August 2002

    It has been difficult to feel optimistic about Zimbabwe for some time. A nation that, for the first few years after independence, seemed to provide an example to the African continent of racial tolerance and economic progress has deteriorated over ...

  • The arbitrary nature of science yields astonishing and surprising results
    Saturday, 10 August 2002

    There is a so-called "Eureka moment" in the film about the discovery of DNA, when the British scientists Francis Crick and James Watson realise that the structure of DNA must be a double helix: the sudden glint of realisation, the run up the stairs,...

  • Desperadoes
    Saturday, 10 August 2002

    For those who already have the Eagles' Hotel California on vinyl, cassette tape and CD, the question now arises: would you like to hear all those old favourites in ever better quality sound than you have ever heard them before? And would the same ap...

  • America will brush aside our concerns and attack Saddam in the spring
    Saturday, 10 August 2002

    All week the argument has raged, so I offer not opinion but instead some predictions. Always a risk, I know, but here's the first prediction. By this time next year a war will have been fought in Iraq, and, barring an extraordinary upset, we wil...

  • Stan Hey: Stressed, bullied, always at breaking point: that's the writers not the actors
    Saturday, 10 August 2002

    If the soap opera industry is in trouble, don't waste sympathy on those actors who will get "written out" in violent circumstances to boost ratings. And don't fret about the producers who will get the "Friday night summons" from the head of drama, fo...

  • The joys of taking a holiday within a holiday
    Saturday, 10 August 2002

    This is decadence, a holiday within a holiday, like leaving a play at the interval to go to the opera. If only... Officially we're in Scotland for six weeks in the house we've been building, and indeed are still building, on an island off the Argyll ...

  • Paul Vallely: Why we care so much about these two young girls
    Saturday, 10 August 2002

    There has been a sad fascination in watching how the nation has responded to the case of the two missing Cambridgeshire schoolgirls this week. What has been striking is the variety of the responses. Local people have searched the fields. Parents acro...

  • Earthly matters
    Friday, 9 August 2002

    Michael Meacher, the Environment Minister, declared yesterday that "the world is in a very serious state". According to some reports, much the same could have been said about Mr Meacher himself. He was, we believe, rather agitated about not seeing ...

  • A case that undermines confidence in the NHS and the medical profession
    Friday, 9 August 2002

    The case of the disgraced former gynaecologist Richard Neale is one of the more disturbing in the annals of medical incompetence. In July 2000 the General Medical Council found him guilty of ruining the lives of 13 women. He did operations without...

  • Fresh ideas and free entry have revived our museums
    Friday, 9 August 2002

    Surprise. Governments can do the right thing. And make a difference. By doing what almost the entire world of literacy and the arts, including this newspaper, asked for and making museum entry free, the Department for Media, Culture and Sport has ign...

  • Saddam Hussein: God protects Arabs and Muslims
    Friday, 9 August 2002

    Among the lessons gained from the history of mankind there is the fact that greed and arrogance combined lead the oppressor to do injustice not only to others but to himself as well, once this union of greed and arrogance has misled him into a sense ...

  • The dark clouds looming over our countryside
    Friday, 9 August 2002

    The days have been damp and dull for August, but if you know where to look, you can always pick out some bright spots in the gloom. Take the resurrection of Snowdonia hawkweed, for instance. It may sound like a character out of Harry Potter, but is i...

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Day In a Page

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice