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Home 2007 September

Saturday, 15 September 2007

  • Leading article: Our criminal ignorance of cannabis
    Sunday, 16 September 2007

    Now that confusion, which was perhaps inevitable as changes in public opinion, government policy and scientific research interacted, has become a real problem. The Government responded slowly to the liberalisation of attitudes, in which our campaign ...

  • Martin Bell: British arms are killing the world's children
    Sunday, 16 September 2007

    The UK was an influential supporter of a ban on the manufacture, sale and export of anti-personnel mines. As a result of that treaty, the use of these abhorrent weapons has all but ceased. An estimated 39 million of these devices have been destroyed ...

  • Sarah Churchwell: The rise of the fat white bastard
    Sunday, 16 September 2007

    Sir Trevor McDonald was officially cleared by Ofcom of racism in calling Bernard Manning a "fat white bastard". Ofcom's reasoning was that the comment was "satirical", adding that it was clear that McDonald's joke was meant to parody Manning's own re...

  • Rod Morgan: They smoke, drink and behave badly. Will we never learn?
    Sunday, 16 September 2007

    The conclusion from the Unicef report that prompted such public hand-wringing when published in the spring, and from other comparative data, is clear. Despite our relative wealth, our young people come out worst among a score of European countries on...

  • Leading article: The Bank of England has at last acted - but this crisis is not over
    Saturday, 15 September 2007

    Three days later, the Bank has been forced to do just that, injecting an extra £4.4bn of funds into the money markets and, late on Thursday, moving to provide emergency assistance for the beleaguered Northern Rock. And yesterday saw something not see...

  • Michael Williams: Readers' editor
    Sunday, 16 September 2007

    Take this complaint from reader Tina Williams from London. "Are you short of staff, short of content, or is your editor too busy? Why send someone with a passionate dislike of Sting to review the Police gig? 'It's Sting, unbeaten champion of the Bigg...

  • Vicki Woods: By the end of fashion week, even the least fashionable among us will know who Agyness Deyn is
    Sunday, 16 September 2007

    Fashion week is good for newspapers, especially when the model-of-the-moment is home-grown, acceptably pretty and humbly born, thus making for a lot of very satisfying rags-to-riches articles. Lovely Agyness, born Laura Hollins in Stubbins, Lancs, on...

  • Letters: EU referendum
    Saturday, 15 September 2007

    The campaign would be dominated by the xenophobic prejudices of much of the press, so we should remember that the EU is, above all, foreign. It speaks other languages, a heinous crime for most monolingual Brits. The EU inhabits the same space as Isla...

  • Leading article: Dedicated to the art of following fashion
    Saturday, 15 September 2007

    To many people, this concern may seem incidental to their lives. They draw more fun than serious reflection from the cultish jamboree surrounding couture and are not going to feel under enormous pressure to cash in their ISAs to buy a pair of Balenci...

  • Katy Guest: Gordon, Maggie, and late-flowering love ...
    Saturday, 15 September 2007

    You can just see them in 10 years' time, giggling on a sofa as Davina shows the couple their "best bits" – Gordon and Maggie's eyes first meeting across a crowded despatch box; Gordon trying to get Maggie's attention by writing Where There's Greed: M...

  • Rupert Cornwell: Out of America
    Sunday, 16 September 2007

    This may be the seat of government of the most powerful country on Earth. But it's also America's last colony, whose inhabitants have yet to get the vote. Now, more than two centuries after Washington DC came into being, that may finally be about to ...

  • Leading article: Flawed science
    Saturday, 15 September 2007

    One result is that many efficacy tests on animals appear to make drugs seem better than they are. Some initially indicate an improvement of 50 per cent. But when the study has been carried out properly, the measured improvement falls by half. The dru...

  • Richard Garner: Food for thought in learning game
    Saturday, 15 September 2007

    His theory that schools should be spending more time looking at neuroscientific research would seem to be bearing some fruit – particularly as a result of the school's own experience in developing a distance learning foreign languages package which i...

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Day In a Page

Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor