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Sunday, 10 February 2008

  • Leading article: The stench of blackmail
    Monday, 11 February 2008

    Again, we see the Russian leader, Vladimir Putin, insisting politics plays no part in this row and maintaining if Ukraine paid its bills, Russia would not be threatening dire measures. Perhaps. Of course there is a financial aspect to the Ukrainian s...

  • Leading article: Parliament must put its house in order – and quickly
    Monday, 11 February 2008

    Indeed, this stipend appears to have been diverted towards all sorts of purchases, ranging from new kitchens to iPods. MPs admit they use the money to pay for the mortgage on a third property, which they rent out and can sell upon retirement for a th...

  • Leading article: No decent law allows coercion
    Sunday, 10 February 2008

    It was no use Dr Williams protesting that he was not talking about the "brutal and inhuman and unjust" forms of sharia as practised in Saudi Arabia or countries where women are stoned for adultery if they are raped. The problem is that, even if we ta...

  • Leo Docherty: Make Afghan poverty history. Then the troops can go home
    Sunday, 10 February 2008

    The escalating violence in the south threatens stability in the rest of the country, while the current bickering between Nato partners about troop levels and commitment ignores the crucial issue: that a shift in strategy, not just greater troop numbe...

  • Letters: Home schooling
    Monday, 11 February 2008

    The one aspect of the article that surprised me was that her action was described as "extreme". Home education is nothing of the kind. The psychologist Frank Smith in The Book of Learning and Forgetting chronicles how the current schooling model has ...

  • Jonathan Raban: We are fighting the wrong battles
    Monday, 11 February 2008

    Recounting a conversation with a friend, a white woman said that, after so many decades of the struggle for women's rights, it was disheartening and unfair that Hillary Clinton's historic candidacy was in danger of being derailed by that of the first...

  • Sarah Churchwell: Abortion is sometimes the happiest ending
    Monday, 11 February 2008

    As many have noticed, Juno is only the latest in a recent spate of American films in which young women coping with unplanned pregnancies take the "totally selfless" route and keep their babies, including last summer's box office hit Knocked Up, and c...

  • Sophie Heawood: A pillowcase is not posterity, Ms Minogue
    Sunday, 10 February 2008

    This story is much more tragic, because it finally proves, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that one of our biggest stars is the human equivalent of Hello Kitty – that vile cartoon cat with a huge pretty head but no mouth, no language, no thoughts. Becaus...

  • Nick Foulkes: The ultimate status symbol – a cigar you can't smoke
    Sunday, 10 February 2008

    The word "trophy" has attached itself adjectivally to all manner of things. The current issue of Vogue, for example, informs us of the return of the "trophy jacket", prized because of its identifiable characteristics. Trophies are the thing among the...

  • Aisha Gill: Police are the key to ending the deaths
    Sunday, 10 February 2008

    Despite these continuing problems, however, it seems "honour" killings are now being seen by the police as serious crimes, requiring a general policy of deterrence and harsh punishment. But we must also change the "habits of belief" which persist acr...

  • Michael Williams: Readers' editor
    Sunday, 10 February 2008

    Headlines such as these have enraged the local MP, Madeleine Moon, who says that media coverage of the deaths is exploiting young people and creating a "copycat effect". She's furious at descriptions of Bridgend as a "death town" or "suicide town". "...

  • Leading article: Tasteless predictions
    Monday, 11 February 2008

    Champion boxer Bernard Hopkins, CBS anchor Harry Smith and our own Doris Lessing are some of the Cassandras grimly predicting a President Obama is bound to go the same way as John F Kennedy. Hopkins said: "They won't let him become President, but if ...

  • Matthew Bell: The IoS diary
    Sunday, 10 February 2008

    A furious caller on BBC Radio Five Live responded to the Archbishop of Canterbury's sharia speech with the immortal words: "Jesus Christ would be turning in his grave!" Um, wasn't there once something about a resurrection? If Rowan Williams does ...

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