The Independent | Archive
Home 2011 February

Sunday, 27 February 2011

  • Leading article: Wisdom of an elder statesman
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    Yet the fall of President Zine el- Abidine Ben Ali in Tunisia and, more so, that of President Hosni Mubarak in Egypt exposed the old thinking behind much of western foreign policy. In a hangover from the Cold War, our government and that of the Unite...

  • Leading article: Ireland must free itself from economic bondage
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    But this election promises to be more than simply a political revolution. Enda Kenny, the leader of Fine Gael and the next prime minister, vowed yesterday to set Ireland on a fresh financial course; one radically different from that charted by his Fi...

  • Andrew Buncombe: You’re breaking up, I’m at the cinema
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    Other things have gone in reverse. Three years ago, I was delighted to discover how simple and quick it was to buy a mobile phone, how cheap the calls were and how good the coverage was even in the most remote parts of the country. But gradually, mob...

  • George Walden: Selling arms will always backfire on Britain
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    Concerns that have surfaced after recent dramas about our policies on arms exports to unsavoury Middle Eastern countries are, for me, nothing new. Having worked in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office for 20 years before becoming an MP, I had grown co...

  • Horatio Clare: Winter is waning; spring is with us. Almost anything seems possible
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    Last week, there was a marvellous morning in the Black Mountains. Sun and scarves of high cloud, the fields singing in new bright colours, the mountains bold against the blue. You could feel the metamorphoses everywhere, but no one quite dared to nam...

  • DJ Taylor: Dear Diary, no knighthood, sick as parrot
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    We learned that the one-time chatelaine of No 10 mistakenly ushered Rudy Giuliani's wife into a crockery cupboard and invited Prince Andrew to inspect the death-mask of that avid Royalist, Oliver Cromwell, that it is the custom for Downing Street sta...

  • Letters: A bloody price for Libya's oil
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    Far from being freeloaders, they have always had to pay overseas tuition fees for their children at universities, despite having paid more British income tax in the past than the parents of students from other EU countries. We are often told of how m...

  • Leading article: The dangers of a circuitous approach
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    The present regulator of care homes, the Care Quality Commission (CQC), is overburdened and under-resourced. It was formed in 2009 out of the Healthcare Commission, the Commission for Social Care Inspection and the Mental Health Act Commission and mu...

  • Nadra Ahmed: Independent sector can't afford more red tape
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    In short, a care home which should easily get an excellence rating under the Government's proposed new system. But such a home may not, for one very simple reason: it may not be able to afford to take part. The National Care Association represents mo...

  • Steve Crawshaw: After too long, the Security Council unites for justice
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    The arms embargo and asset freeze that the council imposed is significant in symbolic and practical terms. Importantly, the decision to refer Libya to the International Criminal Court sends a signal that the killings will not go unpunished. That has ...

  • Michael Bywater: A national brand stuck in the 1920s
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    The underpinnings are in place. Johnny Arab going crackers toppling dictators right and left, while back in Blighty the flannelled fools are at the wicket, the muddied oafs in the goal. The palpably barking Gordon turns out to have been hand in hand ...

  • IoS letters, emails & online postings (27 February 2011)
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    These "stable dictatorships" have enjoyed the support of Western powers, particularly the United States, for many years. When faced with uprisings, they want to maintain that support. But the protesters are demanding things that the West claims to su...

  • Rodric Braithwaite: Is the USSR's Vietnam to be ours, too?
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    For the Soviets, Afghanistan was a worrying place, a neighbour that was a source of Islamic agitation, smuggled drugs, and American intrigue. It was a place where they needed influence, friends, and political stability. They believed that they had mu...

  • Harriet Walker: 'I know exactly how the Oscars starlets will feel'
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    My first appearance on the crimson snake was at an awards ceremony held by the women's magazine for which I used to work; I pulled up in a taxi that lurched to a sudden halt and sent me headfirst into the driver's partition. The throbbing agony left ...

  • Philip Hammond: High-speed rail will fast-track the economy
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    Tomorrow, I will launch a consultation on the Government's proposals for a future national high-speed rail network – a project that promises to transform links between our major cities, and deliver exactly the sort of long-term economic shot in the a...

  • Leading article: Act of kindness?
    Monday, 28 February 2011

    Danny Boyle's Frankenstein opened last week at the National Theatre without a break in the middle of the play. Million Dollar Quartet, which premieres tonight at the Noel Coward Theatre in the West End, will be interval-free. Smaller regional theatre...

  • John Rentoul: Late Book Review
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

  • Matthew Bell: The IoS Diary (27/02/11)
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    It was with spectacularly bad timing, a couple of weeks ago, that Hammersmith and Fulham Council announced plans to close its borough archives, making two experienced archivists redundant as of tomorrow. For it came just as the finishing touches w...

  • Katy Guest: Rant & Rave (27/02/11)
    Sunday, 27 February 2011

    Perhaps it's a sign of getting old, but certain events (my parents' wedding anniversary; the Last Night of the Proms...) come around more frequently as time goes by. The Oscars, however, just become longer every year. You can feel the tension in the ...

SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

The Green Recruitment Company: Operations Manager - Anaerobic Digestion / Biogas

£40000 - £45000 Per Annum: The Green Recruitment Company: Job Title: Operation...

Recruitment Genius: IT Projects Engineer

£18000 - £28000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is a fantastic opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Account Director - OTE £60,000

£40000 - £60000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Inbound Sales Executive

£15000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An Inbound Sales Executive is required t...

Day In a Page

Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent