BOOK REVIEW / Mirrors against the petrifying stare of war: 'The Gaze of the Gorgon' - Tony Harrison: Bloodaxe, 5.95 pounds

Share
Related Topics
TONY HARRISON is probably best known for his determined use of four- letter words. His headline-making poem 'v' actually had the temerity to reprint the curses scrawled on gravestones by stunned and dejected Leeds United fans. It was a great poem. Hardly anyone since Philip Larkin had been able to cram general ideas about social antagonism (v. stands for versus), tender feelings for everyday concerns and candid confessional gestures into such a terrific abbreviated vocabulary. More than that, the poem was poured fluently into blank verse, English poetry's most aristocratic form. But for some reason there were still people precious enough to be enraged by the presence of those undeleted expletives.

Something of the same discomfort was provoked by Harrison's remarkable Gulf war poem, 'A Cold Coming', a work inspired by a striking photograph of a scorched Iraqi head, grey flesh hanging in strands from a half-exposed grimace behind the windscreen of a truck. Stoics unfazed by the sight of high explosives raining down on Baghdad shuddered to see what happened when the bombs landed, just as they had flinched at what lurked behind the traditional asterisks or dashes which signal 'foul' language.

These heckling responses are pretty soft-centred, but fame of any sort usually eludes poets, so perhaps it doesn't matter that in Harrison's case the distortion is so great and so unfair. At any rate, this new volume (which includes 'A Cold Coming') has won the poetry category of this year's Whitbread Prize, and is well worth backing in the bitter contest for the overall trophy in January.

If Harrison does win, it will be because the range of his public concerns is matched by a minute and learned attentiveness to his craft. Take the opening lines of 'A Cold Coming':

I saw the charred Iraqi lean

towards me from bomb-blasted screen'

A lesser poet might have replaced the ultra-rude word 'bomb' with 'the', to preserve the rum-ti-tum rhythm of the line. Not Harrison. He wants the bomb to shatter the couplet and leave a crater in the verse. The awkwardness of the diction is deliberate; it gives us a quick jab, and reminds us that we do not yet know what sort of 'screen' we are talking about: the windscreen of the army truck, or the TV screen in the lounge?

Part of the joke stems from Harrison's octosyllabics, a metre associated with comedy - Butler's Hudibras, Byron's Don Juan, or even Belloc's Cautionary Verses. The very jauntiness of the rhythm, the odd feeling of being caught in the middle of a merry ballad that has taken a wrong turn somewhere, sets up a powerful clash with the morbid intensity of the subject. The chief defect of Henry King was chewing little bits of string, as we know. But what are we to make of couplets such as these:

Don't look away] I know it's hard

to keep regarding one so charred

Excuse a skull half roast, half bone

for using such a scornful tone.

The same clap-your-hands rhythm dominates 'The Gaze of the Gorgon', the newest and most splendid poem in this book (it was screened on television a few weeks ago). It doesn't waste much time drawing distinctions:

Your average Frankfurt-am-Mainer

doesn't give a shit for Heine.

What follows is a verse drama describing, with Harrison's persistent and delicious mixture of high and low tones, the odyssey undertaken by the statue of the German poet Heinrich Heine - a neat idea: the Gorgon turns even poets into stone.

There are, I think, 3 reasons why

my statue's not so bloody high

1. I was subversive; 2.

(what's worse to some) I was a Jew

Once again there is this exciting quarrel between the seriousness of the concerns, the plainness of the language and the bantering joviality of the verse.

Certainly it is an essential part of Harrison's success that he writes public poetry. His muses are Greek - his Oresteia helped provoke something like a rebirth of classical drama - but his poetic models might equally well be Pope and Dryden. His taste is classical, pre-romantic: he seems not to have noticed that 'public poetry' has become almost a tautology. Not prepared to write lyrics about how he feels about the dawn, or how strangely the apple blossom drifts on the breeze, his subjects are war, social injustice and human indignity. It really is amazing that people should resent it so.

It is a long time since people conducted serious arguments in verse. But in Harrison's case the most trenchant social satire is enlivened and deepened by exotic classical allusions. Indeed, the idea that he is a mere angry spokesman for various causes is as demeaning as the notion that he's a foul-mouthed blasphemer. Often we are pushed towards a dictionary: this famous and brilliant plain-speaker is lavish with words such as 'fumaroles' and 'mephitic'; and 'The Gaze of the Gorgon', apart from the classic myth under the petrifying eyes of which the entire poem trembles, includes plenty of Heine's German. The anti-war poems form a sonnet sequence, for goodness sake. This, we must remember, is a poet who prefaces his work with lines from both Arthur Scargill and Seneca.

In a desolate moment in 'v', Harrison stares at the pile of beer cans by his mother's grave, and writes the line:

This pen's all I have of magic wand.

He didn't write 'This pen is', which would have let the line bounce along in its customary dance, because it would have corrupted the emphasis: 'This pen is all I have. . .' would have seemed figurative and vague. Harrison wanted to insist that it was this pen. As always, his interest was in the here and now. But the more he writes, the more likely he seems to last into the hereafter. Indeed, if Pope was right when he declared that every great poem creates the taste by which it should be judged, then we have to recognise that Tony Harrison's recent work is, well, just fucking marvellous.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant / Resourcer

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitment Consu...

Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AngularJS)

£25000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: UI Developer - (UI, JavaScript, HTML...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

I want the Labour Party to lead a revolution in family support

Yvette Cooper
Liz Kendall  

Labour leadership contest: 'Moderniser' is just a vague and overused label

Steve Richards
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine