A day in the life of the zeitgeist

'This small leaflet tells you a lot more than the television programme on which it is based'
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Words are constantly changing meaning these days, twisting and turning in the hands of media and government, youth and fashion alike. To help you to keep track is another instalment of the Glossary of Our Times

Words are constantly changing meaning these days, twisting and turning in the hands of media and government, youth and fashion alike. To help you to keep track is another instalment of the Glossary of Our Times

Address To "address" something is to do nothing about it, as in "it is vital that we address this issue".

Band Name given to a musical group of which no member can play an instrument (as in "boy band", "girl band" etc).

Class

1) "Bad", as in "class warfare", "class conscious" etc;

2) "Good", as in "class act", "class performer" etc.

Club A place of entertainment for the young, outside which they jump up and down in a queue to keep warm and inside which they jump up and down to be cool.

Cow A domesticated animal that farmers used to kill and eat but now they just kill.

Cynic Someone who couldn't care less what the Prince of Wales says.

Diva A title given to any female singer over the age of 20.

Drum'n'bass A method whereby young men are able to propel a car using noise alone.

Elder statesman A politician respected for leaving politics at a time when he had lost all respect.

Factsheet Small leaflet that tells you a lot more than the TV programme it is based on.

Flawed A polite word applied to corrupt processes such as elections in Zimbabwe.

Initiative An old idea found wanting several times before and being tried again.

Jus A thin substitute for gravy

Kit Name given to clothes, when you take them off.

National debate An argument between newspapers.

New It means "Fashionable at the time of writing", as in "White is the new black", "Curling is the new beachball" etc.

Raki Not to be confused with Raku.

Raku Not to be confused with Raki.

Placenta See "Play centre"

Play centre See "Placenta".

Pub A place that was once used for drinking but now displays sporting events on a large screen.

Sausage An item of food into which, in the old days, one put otherwise unwanted leftovers which were just lying around the kitchen and into which nowadays one puts specially imported unwanted leftovers.

Special

1) Another word for "ordinary", as in "special adviser", "special policeman", "special relationship" etc;

2) A dish that a restaurant has too many servings of;

3) A TV programme featuring a star who is too expensive or busy to get for a whole series.

Storm of protest What happens when a newspaper finds five or six MPs who agree to unite in opposition to something.

Strip

1) To take off clothes;

2) Clothes you put on to play football.

TV chef A chef who has to demonstrate that he can actually cook without shouting at his staff.

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