Miles Kington: Let this poor old government die with dignity

A government that forgets the promises it made when it was young, and mumbles expressions like 'we must move on', is a candidate for euthanasia

Share
Related Topics

Is it right for a dying government to be put out of its misery? If the government is suffering terminal decline, but doesn't seem to be aware of its own condition, is it morally right to administer the coup de grace?

That's the question that seems to be exercising my readers at the moment, judging from the flood of letters about it. As I have no particular feelings on the subject myself, it seems only fair to let my readers have their say and print a small selection of their opinions today.

From Mr J Wickston Daly

Sir, History tells us that all governments go through a life cycle analogous to human life itself. They start off fresh and keen, they gradually learn the ropes by making mistakes, they achieve maturity and make real progress, but then, just when you think they are getting into their stride, they start to show symptoms of old age and decrepitude.

In my opinion the present government has now reached that stage. It has forgotten the promises it made when it was young. When, for instance, you remind it that it was going to be tough on crime and tough on the causes of crime, it seems not to know what you are talking about. It seems to have forgotten all about the weapons of mass destruction it claimed were in Iraq. It has forgotten it was responsible for the Dome. It has forgotten lots of other things which I have forgotten about too. It doesn't matter if I forget things. But it does matter if the Government forgets.

What makes it worse is that when you try to get it to talk sense, instead of having any meaningful dialogue the Government finds itself resorting to parroting not very helpful expressions like, "We must move on", "We must draw line under these things", "We have put more money into it than any previous government", and "I am not sorry that we toppled Saddam Hussein".

A government that forgets everything, and which mumbles to itself, is a candidate for euthanasia, in my opinion.

Yours etc

From Dr Lucia Gardener

Sir, May I say how much I agree with the previous writer, and to say that the situation is even worse than he suggests? The Government is prone to senile delusions. As Mr Daly says, the Government loves to say that it is not sorry it toppled Saddam Hussein. But it did not topple Saddam Hussein! The Americans did! Our government has convinced itself that we invaded Iraq and toppled a tyrant, acting alone. It is also convinced that last year was the best year yet for the NHS etc etc.

I think the Government should be given a bottle of whisky and a loaded gun and left to go for a walk in the woods by itself.

Yours etc

From Professor Owen Ketts

Sir, Although I agree largely with the previous writer, she ducks the question by suggesting that a senile and ailing government will put itself out of its misery. In my experience, anyone left with a bottle of whisky and a gun doesn't do the decent thing; it first gets very drunk, then starts taking pot-shots at the nurses.

It may be argued that when a government is old and enfeebled, it will gradually fall to bits and expire of its own accord, and I am sure that is true, but it is a distressing sight for many people, and demands a lot of care and attention, not counting the damage it may cause in its final hours. So we why do we not just give it a small lethal injection in the ballot box?

Yours etc

From Mrs Sheila Cheadle-Hume

Sir, I agree with everything the Professor says, except that I do not think we can wait until the next ballot box comes along, as we shall have a very sick and incontinent government on our hands by then.

I would like to suggest getting things over and done with as soon as possible by staging a fatal car crash in which the government would perish overnight in a spectacular collision with reality. This can easily be done by changing the driver. Specifically, by putting Mr Gordon Brown at the steering wheel.

Yours etc ...

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Web Developer - Junior / Mid Weight

£15000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: To support their continued grow...

Recruitment Genius: Marketing Data Specialist

£22000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: They are the go-to company for ...

Recruitment Genius: Search Marketing Specialist - PPC / SEO

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This is an opportunity to join the UK's leadin...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Administrator

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This caravan dealership are currently recruiti...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Rafael Nadal is down and out, beaten by Dustin Brown at Wimbledon – but an era is not thereby ended  

Sad as it is, Rafael Nadal's decline does not mark the end of tennis's golden era

Tom Peck
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'
10 best statement lightbulbs

10 best statement lightbulbs

Dare to bare with some out-of-the-ordinary illumination
Wimbledon 2015: Heather Watson - 'I had Serena's poster on my wall – now I'm playing her'

Heather Watson: 'I had Serena's poster on my wall – now I'm playing her'

Briton pumped up for dream meeting with world No 1
Wimbledon 2015: Nick Bollettieri - It's time for big John Isner to produce the goods to go with his thumping serve

Nick Bollettieri's Wimbledon Files

It's time for big John Isner to produce the goods to go with his thumping serve
Dustin Brown: Who is the tennis player who knocked Rafael Nadal out of Wimbeldon 2015?

Dustin Brown

Who is the German player that knocked Nadal out of Wimbeldon 2015?
Ashes 2015: Damien Martyn - 'England are fired up again, just like in 2005...'

Damien Martyn: 'England are fired up again, just like in 2005...'

Australian veteran of that Ashes series, believes the hosts' may become unstoppable if they win the first Test