Blue Monday: Stop and think before you grumble on Twitter

The first Monday back in the office after New Year is the day when people post the most negative tweets

Share

As I stood at the bus stop this morning, fat rain drops splashing off my face, I stared glumly at the umbrellas surrounding me and regretted my decision to dash out of the house without one. I had woken up late and barely had time to apply a wobbly line of eyeliner or find a pair of un-laddered tights before I sprinted out into the downpour.

Eyeing the umbrellas enviously, my cold fingers fumbled with the Twitter app on my iPhone, but before I could craft a wittily-worded whine a bus arrived and I ducked under the brolly wielding throng, squeezing myself under the armpit of an equally soggy, equally fed up commuter. So far, Blue Monday was living up to all expectations.  

Black Friday, Manic Monday, Fail Friday - we’ve heard them all. Blue Monday, apparently the most miserable day of the year, is the latest in a long line of ridiculously named days, christened thus to give desperate journalists something to write about.

According to researchers who have analysed more than two million tweets over the past three years, the first Monday back in the office after New Year is the day when people post the most negative tweets. But couldn’t the prefix “blue” be applied to…well…every Monday?

With our Twitter pages never more than a couple of clicks away, come Monday morning the micro-blogging site becomes clogged with pictures of crowded trains, “7am start, sad face” Instagrams, and pathetic bleats about the drizzle. Congested timelines come to a standstill as stranded Londoners moan about the Circle line, parents on the school run panic about traffic, and everyone wishes they’d drunk less and slept more over the weekend.

When we use world-changing technology to grumble about our, relatively easy, lives, it’s hard not to worry about the state of the human condition. George Osborne announced that £25bn more cuts are needed to get the economy on track, but did you hear about the person in Vauxhall who waited FIFTEEN MINUTES for a tube this morning?

(I am by no means excluding myself from this critique, having just tweeted about a minor lunch mishap involving a long queue and a forgotten purse. #BlueMonday.)

Yes, the bus didn’t come on time and yes, you’re drenched from head to toe, and YES someone left a plate full of congealed food on your desk over the weekend, but in the long run is it really worth a passive aggressive tweet that next to no one will read? In my experience, venting via social media only succeeds in using up time which could be better spent day-dreaming about Benedict Cumberbatch. 

So, if you find your fed-up fingers twitching over the “compose tweet” button today, here are three slightly jollier things you could tweet about: 1) Weekend plans. Only five days to go! 2) How the hell did TV show Splash get past ITV executives? 3) This article.

There, sorted. Next stop, Cheerful Tuesday.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Customer Service Advisor

£15000 - £16000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Customer Service Advisor is r...

Recruitment Genius: Plant Fitter - Construction Industry

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This well established construction equipment d...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Uncapped Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitm...

Recruitment Genius: Factory Operatives

£7 - £8 per hour: Recruitment Genius: This high quality thread manufacturer ba...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Bahrainis on an anti-government protest in May  

Hussain Jawad's detainment and torture highlights Britain's shameless stance on Bahraini rights

Emanuel Stoakes
August 1923: Immigrants in a dining hall on Ellis Island, New York.  

When will the Church speak up for the dispossessed, and those that our political system leaves behind?

Stefano Hatfield
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003