HS2: a new railway to drag Britain from the 19th century to the 21st. But are the specifics right?

This morning's details from the government will re-balance Britain and shift long-distance traffic from road to rail. Good. Now rename it Y-Speed 2 and answer critics

Share
Related Topics

The key to a successful infrastructure project is to enthuse more voters than you upset. Conversely, an excellent way to annoy voters is to launch an expensive, disruptive programme which they will bankroll – but which brings them no obvious direct benefit.

A new railway is the right way to drag Britain from the 19th-century to the 21st. The line will re-balance Britain, closing the North-South divide and shifting long-distance traffic from road to rail. But every voter, whether or not they are likely to use the new line, is likely to have a view on how the present plan could be improved.

The £33bn High-Speed 2 project can now be re-named Y-Speed 2, because of the way the line will fork from a junction outside Birmingham to serve Yorkshire and the North-West.

Location, location, location

The main flaw is the most important component, from a passenger perspective: where the stations are - and where they are not. The East Midlands already has a Parkway station in the middle of nowhere, inconvenient even for the airport it was intended to serve. The region is now going to get an East Midlands Hub – a compromise station couple of miles north, which appears designed to exasperate equally the citizens of Derby and Nottingham by being difficult to reach from either city.

Better to slide the fork of the Y 10 miles north-west to Lichfield and run the line along the Trent Valley, alongside the existing tracks, to Derby. It would be cheaper, requiring less new track, and provide the lifeline that Derby needs – a crucible for the Industrial Revolution and a proud railway town now in desperate need of a place on the nation’s new main line.

The citizens of Lichfield may be furious about that alignment, but the present plan has plenty to anger them already. The line swerves around the east of the city to join the existing West Coast Main Line, without pausing for breath. Or passengers.

The argument used to minimise the number of new stations is that stopping en route erodes the time saving. The absurd implication is that every train needs to stop at every stop.

If just one of the 18 trains an hour were to stop at Lichfield, it would halve the current 97-minute journey to London – and make the project more politically acceptable. The French realised this when developing the TGV network: the high-speed lines are punctuated by country stations that placate the people and politicians

Talking of politicans: Patrick McLoughlin deserves praise, along with his last Labour predecessor, Lord Adonis, for unwavering commitment to HS2. But the Transport Secretary should admonish the civil servants who put together the new publicity leaflet for the line.

Pain relief

Just two specific examples of the benefits are cited: “It will make it easier for a Birmingham firm to hire a Leeds solicitor. And for a Manchester web designer to pitch for contracts in London or Amsterdam.”

Putting aside the obvious – there being plenty of excellent lawyers in the West Midlands, and that anyone needing to get from Manchester to Amsterdam will fly – these feeble examples diminish the way that the line will transform Britain’s economic geography and enrich our lives.

More pragmatically, HS2 even promises some relief for the other infrastructure headache, more air capacity for South East England. With a journey time of under an hour to Manchester airport, the main aviation hub outside London will be quicker to reach from the West End than Stansted in Essex. And since it is half-an-hour closer to the US than is Heathrow, with plenty of spare capacity, Manchester could become a proper transatlantic gateway. Even frequent flyers can feel enthused about HS2.

React Now

  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Office Administrator

£14000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An Office Administrator is requ...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive - Commercial Vehicles - OTE £40,000

£12000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Due to expansion and growth of ...

Ashdown Group: Senior PHP Developer - Sheffield - £50,000

£40000 - £50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Senior PHP Developer position with a...

Recruitment Genius: Operations Leader - Plasma Processing

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: An Operations Leader is required to join a lea...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

i Editor's Letter: Most powerful woman in British politics

Oliver Duff Oliver Duff
All the major parties are under pressure from sceptical voters to spell out their tax and spending plans  

Yet again, the economy is the battleground on which the election will be fought

Patrick Diamond
Revealed: Why Mohammed Emwazi chose the 'safe option' of fighting for Isis, rather than following his friends to al-Shabaab in Somalia

Why Mohammed Emwazi chose Isis

His friends were betrayed and killed by al-Shabaab
'The solution can never be to impassively watch on while desperate people drown'
An open letter to David Cameron: Building fortress Europe has had deadly results

Open letter to David Cameron

Building the walls of fortress Europe has had deadly results
Tory candidates' tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they seem - you don't say!

You don't say!

Tory candidates' election tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they appear
Mubi: Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash

So what is Mubi?

Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash all the time
The impossible job: how to follow Kevin Spacey?

The hardest job in theatre?

How to follow Kevin Spacey
Armenian genocide: To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie

Armenian genocide and the 'good Turks'

To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie
Lou Reed: The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond the biographers' and memoirists' myths

'Lou needed care, but what he got was ECT'

The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond
Migrant boat disaster: This human tragedy has been brewing for four years and EU states can't say they were not warned

This human tragedy has been brewing for years

EU states can't say they were not warned
Women's sportswear: From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help

Women's sportswear

From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help
Hillary Clinton's outfits will be as important as her policies in her presidential bid

Clinton's clothes

Like it or not, her outfits will be as important as her policies
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders