Kate Bush, the unicorn of pop, will tour after 35 years in hiding - and I'd give anything to be there

To see the fans who have waited so long, as much as the woman herself

Share

I was yet to be born when Kate Bush embarked on her one and only tour. It was 1979 and “Wuthering Heights” had made the 20-year-old a star the year before. Sadly, it turned out that performing live terrified her. So she stopped doing it.

And so despite the albums she has released sporadically since, I, like many, never thought I’d get to see her on stage. She has been in hiding for 35 years. She became the unicorn of the pop world. It is only her infrequent public appearances, such as receiving a CBE from the Queen last year, that have stopped her from sliding entirely into folklore. So the news that the 55-year-old singer is to play 15 shows at the end of the summer has understandably been met with hysterical levels of excitement by her many, many fans.

Some have compared Bush’s surprise announcement this morning to when, last year, David Bowie unexpectedly dropped his album, The Next Day, after a decade in the wilderness. But Bush’s reappearance is a much bigger deal. People had given up on her; they accepted that she was done with public life. All her followers could hope for was perhaps a new record once in a while. And even that seemed optimistic.

No one could have imagined they would ever get to witness “Hounds of Love” and “Running Up That Hill” being sung live (well, by the woman herself; her tracks often feature in karaoke sessions after too many gins have given birth to over-confidence). I can’t imagine what the first night will be like. I would give anything to be there. To see the fans who have waited for 35 years, as much as the woman herself.

Come August, you can expect plenty of famous musicians to be in attendance at the shows. Her influence is far and wide. Any female singer who ever donned feathers and spun around the stage has Bush on their mind. Lady Gaga, Florence Welch and Bat for Lashes are just some of the recent names to be inspired by her. And it’s not just women drawn to her. Every band from Outkast to Coldplay claims that Bush had an impact on them. Ariel Pink even wrote the song, “For Kate I Wait”, about her.

He won’t have to any more. None of us do.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Guru Careers: Trainee Installation Engineer / Field Service Engineer / Customer Support Exec

£16 - 18k: Guru Careers: A Trainee Installation Engineer / Field Service Engin...

Recruitment Genius: Electricians Mate / Electricians Labourer

£22000 - £26000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Approved NICEIC contractor is l...

Recruitment Genius: 1st / 2nd Line IT Support Technician

£30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: They are a small IT consultancy business...

Recruitment Genius: Operations Manager - North West

£50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This company is profitable and privately...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

I'm pansexual – here are the five biggest misconceptions about my sexuality

Farhana Khan
 

Daily catch-up: Ancient Labour rivalries – Bevan versus Morrison

John Rentoul
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935