Alice Jones: Can Mormons ever have street cred? Discuss

IMHO...

Share
Related Topics

Video killed the radio star, or, in the case of Brandon Flowers, YouTube killed the rock star.

The Killers' frontman, known for epic choruses, arena grandstanding and glittery jackets, has made a promotional video for the Mormon church. In it he wears a lumberjack shirt, cuddles his children, smiles beatifically and extols the holy life. "There are a lot of connotations that come along with rock music, and it's usually sex-driven or money-driven. I realised early on that wasn't the road for me", he says.

Presumably he will now return the royalties from "Bones", "Glamorous Indie Rock'n'Roll" and any other songs which mention sex, drugs and heathen pursuits. The video concludes: "My name is Brandon Flowers. I'm a father, a husband and I'm a Mormon." At least, he didn't add "rockstar", for Flowers has surely killed any shred of credibility his band had dead.

More importantly, the video appears at a critical time in politics. Mitt Romney, the frontrunner for the Republican nomination is a Mormon and as such, Flowers' video is a neat little piece of backdoor campaigning. He claims to wants to "educate the public" about his faith but his soft-focus home movie fails to address a single preconception . It's a wasted opportunity to engage in a debate that urgently needs thrashing out.

Not least because Romney is intent on skirting the one thing everyone knows about him (a survey this week found "Mormon" the word most associated with him), huffing that candidates should not be subjected to a "religious test". It's an unsurprising tactic, given that rivals are calling his religion a "cult" and a poll revealed that one in five US voters said they would not vote for a Mormon for President. It's also a slippery one. Rockstar or politician, you can't do God and not do God at the same time.

***

It seems a little premature to be writing the Olympics' last will and testament before a single medal has been won, but Boris Johnson's fondness for speeches involving the word legacy refuses to abate. The latest post-Games gift for London to be announced is a 1,200-home development, a discus' throw from the Olympic park in Stratford, to be built by Ikea.

According to the furniture store's investment arm, Inter Ikea, the estate will resemble a "mini-Venice", with sustainable homes clustered around canals, piazzas and floating cocktail bars. There will also be, for no apparent reason, a 130ft "illuminated wooden tower", built entirely using MDF, rawl plugs and Allen keys. OK, I made up the Allen keys bit, but it does make you wonder about their vision for Ikea Town. Seen from above, will it look – as it does in the blueprint - like a sea of Billy bookcases? Will the streets be lit by thousands of unnecessary tealights? And, most importantly, will everyone who lives there end up really, really stressed?

***

Being British, I'm congenitally nosy about what people get up to behind closed doors. I'm still grieving for Through the Keyhole, so cruelly axed in 2008. So I was delighted when, a couple of years ago, I came across The Selby. The website (www.theselby.com) posts glossy photographs of creative types hanging out at home, from architects in Manhattan lofts to fashion designers in Tokyo studios. They don't have to be famous to be fascinating but it's all the better if they are. Life is just a little richer for knowing that Philippe Starck keeps a stuffed polar bear in his hall.

The website has now launched The Edible Shelby, in which it goes behind the scenes at the coolest restaurants and bars around the world. It is, frankly, gastroporn – steamy scenes at the pass, patissiers sploshing about in chocolate, mixologists gently muddling jewel-coloured liqueurs, that sort of thing.

It's a recession and waistline-friendly way of eating out without leaving the house – and far more stylish than those annoying food "portraits" people have taken to posting on Facebook.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Office / Sales Manager

£22000 - £32000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Established and expanding South...

Recruitment Genius: Administrative Assistant / Order Fulfilment

£14000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An exciting opportunity to join a thrivi...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Uncapped OTE: SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consulta...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Uncapped OTE: SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consulta...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

Syria's Kurds have little choice but to flee amid the desolution, ruins and danger they face

Patrick Cockburn
A bartender serves two Mojito cocktails  

For the twenty-somethings of today, growing up is hard to do

Simon Kelner
Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement