Andrew Grice: The yellow battlebus is still driving this election campaign

Inside The Election

Share
Related Topics

Gordon Brown was running out of small talk. "What's your favourite colour?" he asked a paint shop apprentice at the BMW Mini plant in Oxford this week. "Yellow," came the reply.

Brown aides looked nervously at each other: the Liberal Democrats' yellow bird flew into mind. Even when the Prime Minister is on the road, there is no escaping the rise of the yellow tide which dominates the election. By Mr Brown's side was his old ally Andrew Smith, a former cabinet minister who might be washed away by it as he defends a majority of 332 over the Liberal Democrats in Oxford East.

The spectacular advance of the Liberal Democrats has electrified this campaign, making it the most fascinating and unpredictable of the seven I have covered as a long-term inmate of the Westminster institution. With the exception of 1992, the previous results were never really in doubt. The Conservatives, and possibly the Liberal Democrats, could conceivably come top in terms of the share of the vote. Labour insists it can still "win" but seems in a worse place than it was a week ago. Coming third in the share of the vote and still winning most seats would not give Mr Brown a mandate to govern the country, even though there would be a good prospect of a Lib-Lab deal in such circumstances.

After tension in the Tory high command over the Clegg effect, nerves have been steadied by a slight recovery in the polls and David Cameron's improved performance in the second leaders' TV debate on Thursday. "Our motto has been 'keep calm and carry on' ," said one Tory insider. The Tories did not see the Liberal Democrat threat coming but have finally thrashed out a strategy for tackling it.

There is palpable relief in Labour land that the party is still in the game and over Mr Brown's better showing on Thursday. "He is remarkably resilient – indestructible," one close ally said yesterday. Labour will now play the "experience" card against both Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg for all it is worth. Yesterday's official figures showing how fragile the recovery is suited Labour's strategy nicely.

Mr Brown will use next week's final TV debate on the economy to tell voters not to gamble on either of the other two parties. Although the debates dominate the campaign, Labour now hopes it will become a rather more traditional one, in which issues like the economy and public services rather than the personality of the leaders come to the fore. The small print of the polls shows that Mr Brown scoring well on strength, being Prime Minister, even having the right ideas. The big challenge is to translate that into improved Labour ratings when he is not liked.

As with the Tories, the Clegg phenomenon has sparked tension in the Labour camp. Not everyone in the Cabinet shares the appetite for a Lib-Lab coalition or deal over key Commons votes shown by the likes of Lord Mandelson and Lord Adonis. Although it may be the only way for Labour to hang on to power, their internal critics fear a downward spiral in which Labour is not seen as offering the change the country demands, so the choice of change becomes between the Tories and Liberal Democrats. This is the choice the Tories and the newspapers backing them want to pose, writing Labour out of the script.

Having emphasised its common ground with the Liberal Democrats on constitutional reform, I suspect Labour will now counter the Tory plan by clobbering rather than cuddling Mr Clegg. If Labour gets too close to the Liberal Democrats before 6 May, it only helps the Tories run their "vote Clegg, get Brown" line, which is no fantasy when you look at the polls. So Labour talk about a Lib-Lab coalition will be off-limits until 7 May, when they could be on again – unless Mr Cameron can win more seats than Labour, in which case the Tory leader would be in pole position in a hung parliament.

When I interviewed Mr Clegg this week, he seemed like a man who, without taking anything for granted, is now thinking about what he would do in a hung parliament. He believes a deal could be done much more quickly than people think, within days not weeks. He is sure his party would act responsibly to ensure financial as well as political stability. He is confident of taking his party with him, and would want to.

Although Mr Cameron and Mr Brown bounced back in Thursday's debate, it is Mr Clegg who is still making the running in this election. Labour and the Tory strategists knew that elections are decided in the centre ground but they never dreamt the man in the middle would colonise so much of it.

Nor is it enough, as the Tories assumed, to bang on about "change", sit back and garner votes. "Change" has become a devalued currency since all the parties profess to offer it. In his hour-long chat with me, the word Mr Clegg used most was "different". He did the same in Thursday's debate, saying: "Don't let anyone tell you that this time it can't be different, it can." The problem for Mr Brown and Mr Cameron is that Mr Clegg really is different, and the voters like it.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Tradewind Recruitment: English Teacher

Negotiable: Tradewind Recruitment: My client is an excellent, large partially ...

Tradewind Recruitment: Science Teacher

£90 - £140 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: I am currently working in partnersh...

Tradewind Recruitment: Year 3 Primary Teacher

£100 - £150 per day: Tradewind Recruitment: Year 3 Teacher Birmingham Jan 2015...

Ashdown Group: Lead Web Developer (ASP.NET, C#) - City of London

£45000 - £50000 per annum + Excellent benefits: Ashdown Group: Lead Web Develo...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

i Editor's Letter: Science versus religion in the three-parent baby debate

Oliver Duff Oliver Duff
Kylie has helped to boost viewing figures for the talent show  

When an Aussie calls you a ‘bastard’, you know you’ve arrived

Howard Jacobson
Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee