Katy Guest: Kylie deserves to be so lucky in love at last

Share
Related Topics

Call it coincidence or call it destiny, but something romantic is in the air this week and Mills & Boon couldn't have asked for better publicity for their 100th anniversary. In a story that could have come straight out of their Superromance series, the world's most beloved girl-next-door-turned-beautiful-princess once again strolled arm-in-arm down the Seine with the "love of her life" at the weekend. The birds are singing, it's springtime in Paris and Kylie Minogue and Olivier Martinez are back together. Friends say the singer is "overwhelmed with happiness" to be back in his arms – his masterful, brooding, manly arms.

It seems incredible that even before Sex And The City, before Desperate Housewives, before every little girl grew up longing for her own Richard Curtis movie ending (she nearly misses the train, there's a stage, he loves her after all, it snows...), a blueprint for the perfect romantic finale was being imprinted on every impressionable mind.

Kylie and Olivier fit the mould exactly. He is the brooding Frenchman with devastating blue eyes and a pathological fear of commitment. She is the feisty Australian heroine who melted his cold, French heart. Their break-up lasted a year and a day and, when he had satisfied himself that he couldn't live without her, he drunk-dialled her number and decided to offer her everything. Her wishes for marriage, fidelity and cute French babies seem about to come true.

Unfortunately, outside the world of Mills & Boon and their wicked offspring, Richard Curtis happy endings are rarely so happy and hardly ever turn out to be endings at all. Minogue's family is said to be fuming that she is back in the arms of the cad Martinez, who broke her heart so publicly a year ago. Her friends think she is making a terrible mistake. If she were to write to Dear Deirdre, no doubt the agony aunt would say that getting back with an ex is always a bad idea. Mills & Boon are not known for tackling taboos, but the one inviolable rule they do break is in allowing for love the second time round. In romantic novels, people and situations can change. In the outside world, that is unthinkable.

We live in a get-over-it-and-move-on age, in which celebrity years are shorter than dog years and girl singers get married and divorced twice in the time it takes most people to sink ten large gin and tonics and turn his picture to face the wall. Couples divorce on the grounds that the passion is gone, their partner is flawed and they have discovered that they are better off as best friends.

But what could be better than being married to your best friend? And is it so bizarre to forgive someone's flaws and try again? Kylie says she has looked around and not found anyone she likes better than Olivier. Perhaps her mistake was looking around in London, not Paris, but give the girl a break.

Right now, Kylie's friends should watch what they say. You cannot hold someone else's grudges and she will not thank them for trying. One woman I knew wrote a letter to her newly-single friend, detailing the faults of the just-ex-boyfriend that she was clearly better off without. By the time it arrived, he had come back, they were engaged and the letter-writer was crossed off the wedding list.

It is a spark of hope in a cruel old world that someone out there still believes in romance, and if we all hold hands and wish very hard it just might succeed. Kylie deserves a Mills & Boon ending more than most: with a train, a stage, a public declaration of love – and very definitely snow.

Oh, Gordon, try turning on the charm

Hats off to the mess of contradictions that is Gordon Ramsay, who says he hates show-off "celebrity chefs" but seems to have it written into his contract that he must take his top off at least twice in every television programme and who, brilliantly, doesn't like being shouted at or talked down to in any way.

Now he has decided to further his domination of the world by cornering the market in affordable food, and has come up with a menu for a bargain £30 a head.

Once wine and service are added, this should be just about affordable by anyone who owns a string of restaurants worth £1.5m a year, which is marvellous news.

Oh, Gordon. As far as brains and charm are concerned, it's a good job you're good-looking.

* BBC4's Doctors To Be: 20 Years On is an illuminating follow-up to the 1980s television series. Two decades on, those junior doctors are older, wiser and mostly happier. But what happened to the altruism that got them through 18-hour shifts on ProPlus and dizzy optimism alone? And when did one of them make the move from "helping people" to "getting lots of time off to play golf"?

Judging by reactions to Alan Johnson's letter to GPs this week, altruism is in short supply in the NHS. The Health Secretary wants GPs to open surgeries longer so people can actually see them – and doctors don't like it. While he's at it, could he ask them not to roll their eyes at patients, not to have receptionists who act as Cerberus guarding the gates of Hell, and not to look up symptoms on netdoctor.co.uk in front of their patients? And how much extra pay do they want for being nice?

k.guest@independent.co.uk

React Now

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Web Developer (C#, ASP.NET, AJAX, JavaScript, MVC, HTML)

£40000 - £45000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: Web Developer ...

C# R&D .NET Developer-Algorithms, WCF, WPF, Agile, ASP.NET,MVC

£50000 - £67000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: C# R&D .NE...

C# Developer (Web, HTML5, CSS3, ASP.NET, JS, Visual Studios)

£40000 - £50000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: C# Developer (...

C# Developer (ASP.NET, F#, SQL, MVC, Bootstrap, JavaScript)

£55000 - £65000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: C# Developer (...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Damaged copies of Islam's holy book the Koran lie on the rubble from a destroyed mosque following an Israeli military strike in the Nusseirat refugee camp in the central Gaza Strip  

Why doesn't the media ever mention the lack of progress in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk
David Cameron at a recent event  

Cameron is under pressure to misrepresent the Tory party as a reflection of the electorate

Matthew Norman
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor
Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy: Was the otter man the wildlife champion he appeared to be?

Otter man Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy

The aristocrat's eccentric devotion to his pets inspired a generation. But our greatest living nature writer believes his legacy has been quite toxic
Joanna Rowsell: The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia

Joanna Rowsell: 'I wear my wig to look normal'

The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef gives raw ingredients a lift with his quick marinades

Bill Granger's quick and delicious marinades

Our chef's marinades are great for weekend barbecuing, but are also a delicious way of injecting flavour into, and breaking the monotony of, weekday meals
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014 preview: Why Brazilians don't love their neighbours Argentina any more

Anyone but Argentina – why Brazilians don’t love their neighbours any more

The hosts will be supporting Germany in today's World Cup final, reports Alex Bellos
The Open 2014: Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?

The Open 2014

Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?