The truth is out there: 10/10/2009

A weekly look at the world

Share
Related Topics

*If historical coincidences are ominous, then the Tory party's choice of HQ during conference season is an unfortunate one. The Grade II-listed Midland Hotel in Manchester was allegedly the planned staging post for the Nazi party following its intended invasion of Britain.

*This week marks the 30th anniversary of the arrival of the barcode on British shores. It first appeared at a branch of Key Market in Spalding, Lincolnshire. A US invention, the first designs were circular and were greeted with much scepticism, people allegedly fearing the lasers used to scan them.

*Scientists have discovered a new species of glow-in-the-dark mushroom deep in the Brazilian rainforest. The find, published in the journal Mycologia and reported by Horticulture Week, is one of seven new species of glow-in-the-dark fungi found around the world, bringing the total to 71. Though psychedelic-looking, the new species is not believed to be hallucinogenic. It is called Mycena luxaeterna, which, as the name suggests, was inspired by Mozart's Requiem.

*The Nikon Small World Competition recognises the best in microscopic photography and this week it was won by Estonian scientist Heiti Paves of the Tallinn Institute of Technology for a 20x magnified picture of thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana). The species is important according to New Scientist, after it made history in 2000 becoming the first plant to have its entire genetic code sequenced.

*Police in Washington state believe they have cracked the case of the joy-flying "barefoot burglar" after arresting Colton "Colt" Harris-Moore, 18. The teenager is accused of a slew of crimes including stealing three light aircraft which he took and crashed in the past year, according to CNN. His crimes have become so notorious he even has a fan page on Facebook.

*A hotel in Venice Beach, California, has come up with a novel way to fight the recession, according to The Los Angeles Times. Hotel Erwin hopes its new package offering a free tattoo and a bottle of tequila will keep its 119 rooms full. Meanwhile, San Diego's Hard Rock Hotel will lend you a Harley-Davidson motorbike during your stay, The New York Times reports.

*New roads may seem an unlikely solution to the world's climate crisis but that is exactly what one US inventor hopes to achieve with his new "solar road panel". This week, Scientific American magazine reported on the work of Scott Brusaw of Sagle, Idaho, who is currently building a prototype of his solar road panel which will help to power the national grid via super-strong solar panels under roads.

*A quick-thinking security guard has shot to fame in the Philippines after saving part of the former first lady Imelda Marcos's shoe collection from floods that devastated the country. The 200-pair display was moved upstairs just before flood waters swamped the ground floor of the Marikina Shoe Museum near Manila.

truth@independent.co.uk

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Sports Simulator / Home Cinema Installation Technician

£20000 - £24000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This established Simulation Tec...

Recruitment Genius: Trainee Sales Consultants - OTE up to £35,000

£15000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Franchise Operations Manager - Midlands or North West

£40000 - £60000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: The position will be home based...

Recruitment Genius: Hotel and Spa Duty Manager

£18000 - £24000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: If you are friendly, sociable, ...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

Daily catch-up: the Greeks can stay in the euro or end ‘austerity’, but not both

John Rentoul
The old 1,000 Greek drachma notes and current 20 euros  

Greece debt crisis: History shows 'new drachma' is nothing to fear

Sean O'Grady
How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

Holographic projections would provide extra information on objects in a person's visual field in real time
Sugary drinks 'are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year'

Sugary drinks are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year

The drinks that should be eliminated from people's diets
Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map
Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue