The truth is out there: 17/04/2010

A weekly look at the world

Share
Related Topics

*A new study claims to have found a human population immune to racial stereotypes.

Children with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that limits social anxiety, displayed no racial biases when shown pictures of other children and asked to assign good or bad traits. A control group reliably pointed to other races when asked questions like "which is the naughty boy," said livescience.com.

*America's top 25 hedge fund managers earn the equivalent of 658,000 teachers, according to Les Leopold, writing in The Huffington Post. With an average salary of $1bn (£650m) each, their combined earnings would pay the $38,000 salaries of enough educators to enlighten 13 million young people.

*New Scientist this week championed the efforts of Number Watch's Warm List; a comprehensive and fully linked list of all the things the media has said are caused by global warming. Among the credible and terrifying effects are some which are less so, including claims that it is responsible for child insomnia, frogs with three heads and six legs, the decline of haggis and beer, swelling cockroach and starfish numbers, saving endangered salmon, forcing lemmings out of house and home and boosting seal sex.

*Charity starts at home for both Greeks and Americans as their respective governments have both launched services offering their citizens the chance to donate to the national debt. According to the Freakonomics blog, the Greeks have developed a Solidarity Account, whilst the US Department of the Treasury conveniently offers the chance to donate online.

*A notorious San Francisco beggar known as 'Hate Man' – because of his request that everybody say "I hate you" before engaging him in conversation – has been revealed to be the former New York Times journalist Mark Hawthorne. In an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle, the cross-dressing, rubbish-eating 73-year-old described his world view, which revolves around being "straight about the negatives".

*The US Navy lieutenant Don Walsh has been awarded the Hubbard Medal, National Geographic's highest honour, for travelling to the deepest place in any ocean on our planet. The 35,800ft descent into the Mariana Trench off Guam was actually made 50 years ago and, half a century later, Walsh and his co-pilot Jacques Piccard remain the only two people to have plunged into the Earth's ultimate abyss.

*Despite widespread perceptions to the contrary, more immigrants are in white-collar jobs than blue-collar ones, according to a new analysis of census data in the US. The Fiscal Policy Institute's latest research, reported by The New York Times, found that in 14 of the 25 largest metropolitan areas, including Boston, New York and San Francisco, more immigrants were likely to be doctors, lawyers and the like, than the much vilified stereotypes of cleaners and labourers, perceived to be flooding across the southern border.

truth@independent.co.uk

React Now

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Dynamics CRM Developer (C#, .NET, Dynamics CRM 2011/2013)

£40000 - £60000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: Dynamics CRM D...

Web Developer (C#, ASP.NET, AJAX, JavaScript, MVC, HTML)

£40000 - £45000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: Web Developer ...

C# R&D .NET Developer-Algorithms, WCF, WPF, Agile, ASP.NET,MVC

£50000 - £67000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: C# R&D .NE...

C# Developer (Web, HTML5, CSS3, ASP.NET, JS, Visual Studios)

£40000 - £50000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: C# Developer (...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

i Deputy Editor's Letter:

Independent Voices, Indy Voices Rhodri Jones
A couple stand in front of a beautiful cloudy scene  

In sickness and in health: It’s been stormy but there are blessings in the clouds

Rebecca Armstrong
Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor
Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy: Was the otter man the wildlife champion he appeared to be?

Otter man Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy

The aristocrat's eccentric devotion to his pets inspired a generation. But our greatest living nature writer believes his legacy has been quite toxic
Joanna Rowsell: The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia

Joanna Rowsell: 'I wear my wig to look normal'

The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef gives raw ingredients a lift with his quick marinades

Bill Granger's quick and delicious marinades

Our chef's marinades are great for weekend barbecuing, but are also a delicious way of injecting flavour into, and breaking the monotony of, weekday meals
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014 preview: Why Brazilians don't love their neighbours Argentina any more

Anyone but Argentina – why Brazilians don’t love their neighbours any more

The hosts will be supporting Germany in today's World Cup final, reports Alex Bellos
The Open 2014: Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?

The Open 2014

Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?