Drive-in movies

Car parks, particularly those of the elevated variety, can rarely rely on a secure place in the public's affection. Seen one, seen them all; the levels all look pretty much the same, too, which has often caused us problems in the past. In Gateshead, though, it's different. In Gateshead, there's a car park that lots of people really like: the one used in that remarkably popular British gangster movie of the Seventies Get Carter. And now they are fighting to save it from demolition.

Car parks, particularly those of the elevated variety, can rarely rely on a secure place in the public's affection. Seen one, seen them all; the levels all look pretty much the same, too, which has often caused us problems in the past. In Gateshead, though, it's different. In Gateshead, there's a car park that lots of people really like: the one used in that remarkably popular British gangster movie of the Seventies Get Carter. And now they are fighting to save it from demolition.

Such cult status afforded to a multistorey car park says rather more about the British film industry than it does about Gateshead. Get Carter was an entertaining film with some memorable lines (our own favourite has always been Michael Caine's remark, while watching a blue movie: "What's that, then, a python?"). But it owes its reputation mostly to the paucity of the competition.

Still, why not seize this opportunity to turn the car park into a British film shrine? When you think about it, many of our other classics - The Italian Job, Carry on Cabby, On the Buses, Confessions of a Driving Instructor... need we continue? - have had a strong transport theme.

Perhaps, too, Michael Winner could make a film about a car park. And John Prescott could open it.

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