IoS letters, emails & online postings (27 June 2010)

Share
Related Topics

Your editorial on government economic strategy (20 June) argues that if pain is needed it should be focused on the better-off in society. But a government dominated by public schoolboys and Bullingdon Club members is unlikely to be found seriously taxing the rich, until the pips squeak or otherwise. And who says that economic pain is needed? Mainly politicians of the S&M school who get vicarious enjoyment out of cutting jobs and services and would do so even if the economy was booming, when they would simply use the money to fund tax cuts for the rich.

Keith Flett

London N17

In your Budget preview ("Who will feel the squeeze?", 20 June), the property landlord seems to think that he should not be treated for tax as an investor but as a businessman. If so, he could start buying and selling houses regularly and then HMRC might well accept an argument that he is trading and charge him income tax on his sale profits and not capital gains tax. Or he could put the properties into a limited company and then buy and sell property to his heart's content. But then he would pay corporation tax on the profits and CGT when he retires and sells his shares.

The original Cable proposals on CGT were about fairness and equality. If you turn a profit by selling your own labour or by playing with money you should pay tax on that profit. Steve Bartlett currently has a huge advantage over "businessmen", which he would lose if he becomes a business himself.

John Barnes

Chelmsford, Essex

Joan Smith asks, "What about compensation for Bhopal?" (20 June). Fair comment. But what about compensation for the victims of the mega-industrial dumping from 40,000 feet of Agent Orange on Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos (without even so much as formally declaring war on the latter two)? The US Military Intelligence Corps is still disputing liability for that act of state terrorism.

Martin Wallis

Shipham, Norfolk

There is also America's energy profligacy: 4 per cent of the world's population accounting for 24 per cent of its oil consumption. Obama might choose to correct this situation thus freeing himself from any further dependence on companies such as BP.

Barry Clarke

Shepton Mallet, Somerset

As a retired school teacher I have had first-hand experience of many children who have suffered from bad parenting ("Children need good parents, not a state nanny", 13 June). They have not been taught the basics of appropriate behaviour, let alone how to speak in sentences, dress, feed or use the toilet at their infant school. Parents of these children assume that it is the school's task to provide this training, naturally to the detriment of the remaining children in the class.

Somewhere, the idea of giving children basic skills and guidelines seems to have been lost. We have a generation in which some parents have no role models or no inclination to "restrict the child's freedom". Like many others in my former profession, I feel that the only solution is to make lessons in parenting compulsory for all secondary schoolchildren. Sex education is now given in schools so the children know the mechanics of having, or not having, children. Now they need lessons in how to treat those children, nurture them, love them in a non-spoiling way, and generally make them happy and fulfilled.

In any class of children there are few future rocket scientists, but the vast majority will become parents. We owe it to future generations to try to turn them all into responsible and caring parents with the ability to give time to their offspring.

Christina Hartley

Horndean, Hampshire

Having read John Smart's letter on nationalism (20 June), I find myself asking why, still, in 2010, Wales is not included in the Union flag. Welsh, and proud to be so, I, like many fellow Welsh people, long for the recognition our country deserves. After all the English have taken from Wales through history, isn't it about time they gave us something back? To be recognised on the Union flag would be a good place to start.

June Howells

Headington, Oxford

After long personal and professional experience of British Immigration Control I know that the key consideration in deciding a case is usually money ("UK allows ousted Kyrgyz president's son to stay for now", 20 June). If an immigrant has it in quantity, no matter how ill-gotten, difficulties disappear. If not, then problems arise manifold.

To some extent this is true of the general population: racial tensions are not obvious in Kensington where there is apparently a very wealthy Arab population, but in Rochdale, racial tension is aroused by a lady with an Irish name speaking to the then Prime Minister about East Europeans coming to earn a crust.

Peter Hawkins

Posted online

Have your say

Letters to the Editor, Independent on Sunday, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5HF; email: sundayletters@independent.co.uk (with address; no attachments, please); fax: 020 7005 2627; online: independent.co.uk/dayinapage/2010/June/27

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Senior Risk Manager - Banking - London - £650

£600 - £650 per day: Orgtel: Conduct Risk Liaison Manager - Banking - London -...

Commercial Litigation Associate

Highly Attractive Package: Austen Lloyd: CITY - COMMERCIAL LITIGATION - GLOBAL...

Systems Manager - Dynamics AX

£65000 - £75000 per annum + Benefits: Progressive Recruitment: The client is a...

Service Delivery Manager (Software Development, Testing)

£40000 - £45000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A well-established software house ba...

Day In a Page

Read Next
The economy expanded by 0.8 per cent in the second quarter of 2014  

British economy: Government hails the latest GDP figures, but there is still room for skepticism over this 'glorious recovery'

Ben Chu
Comedy queen: Miranda Hart has said that she is excited about working on the new film  

There is no such thing as a middle-class laugh

David Lister
Evan Davis: The BBC’s wolf in sheep’s clothing to take over at Newsnight

The BBC’s wolf in sheep’s clothing

What will Evan Davis be like on Newsnight?
Finding the names for America’s shame: What happens to the immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border without documents who never make it past the Arizona desert?

Finding the names for America’s shame

The immigrants crossing the US-Mexico border without documents who never make it past the Arizona desert
Inside a church for Born Again Christians: Speaking to God in a Manchester multiplex

Inside a church for Born Again Christians

As Britain's Anglican church struggles to establish its modern identity, one branch of Christianity is booming
Rihanna, Kim Kardashian and me: How Olivier Rousteing is revitalising the house of Balmain

Olivier Rousteing is revitalising the house of Balmain

Parisian couturier Pierre Balmain made his name dressing the mid-century jet set. Today, Olivier Rousteing – heir to the house Pierre built – is celebrating their 21st-century equivalents. The result? Nothing short of Balmania
Cancer, cardiac arrest, HIV and homelessness - and he's only 39

Incredible survival story of David Tovey

Tovey went from cooking for the Queen to rifling through bins for his supper. His is a startling story of endurance against the odds – and of a social safety net failing at every turn
Backhanders, bribery and abuses of power have soared in China as economy surges

Bribery and abuses of power soar in China

The bribery is fuelled by the surge in China's economy but the rules of corruption are subtle and unspoken, finds Evan Osnos, as he learns the dark arts from a master
Commonwealth Games 2014: Highland terriers stole the show at the opening ceremony

Highland terriers steal the show at opening ceremony

Gillian Orr explores why a dog loved by film stars and presidents is finally having its day
German art world rocked as artists use renowned fat sculpture to distil schnapps

Brewing the fat from artwork angers widow of sculptor

Part of Joseph Beuys' 1982 sculpture 'Fettecke' used to distil schnapps
BBC's The Secret History of Our Streets reveals a fascinating window into Britain's past

BBC takes viewers back down memory lane

The Secret History of Our Streets, which returns with three films looking at Scottish streets, is the inverse of Benefits Street - delivering warmth instead of cynicism
Joe, film review: Nicolas Cage delivers an astonishing performance in low budget drama

Nicolas Cage shines in low-budget drama Joe

Cage plays an ex-con in David Gordon Green's independent drama, which has been adapted from a novel by Larry Brown
How to make your own gourmet ice lollies, granitas, slushy cocktails and frozen yoghurt

Make your own ice lollies and frozen yoghurt

Think outside the cool box for this summer's tempting frozen treats
Ford Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time, with sales topping 4.1 million since 1976

Fiesta is UK's most popular car of all-time

Sales have topped 4.1 million since 1976. To celebrate this milestone, four Independent writers recall their Fiestas with pride
10 best reed diffusers

Heaven scent: 10 best reed diffusers

Keep your rooms smelling summery and fresh with one of these subtle but distinctive home fragrances that’ll last you months
Commonwealth Games 2014: Female boxers set to compete for first time

Female boxers set to compete at Commonwealth Games for first time

There’s no favourites and with no headguards anything could happen
Five things we’ve learned so far about Manchester United under Louis van Gaal

Five things we’ve learned so far about United under Van Gaal

It’s impossible to avoid the impression that the Dutch manager is playing to the gallery a little