IoS letters, emails & online postings (1 May 2011)

Share
Related Topics

Brian Cathcart is critical of the Press Complaints Commission and also refers to it as "no more than" a complaints body ("Bad editors have blown it for the rest", 24 April). It is true that last year we issued about 1,800 rulings and resolved over 500 complaints to the satisfaction of the complainant. We think it important to offer real and cost-free help to those who come to us. But we also have a 24-hour helpline, run by senior staff, to deal with concerns about harassment by journalists; pre-publication advice to individuals to help prevent intrusions from happening; pre-publication advice to editors and journalists; and training sessions for editors and journalists.

While Professor Cathcart suggested that no lessons were learnt and that the PCC was inactive over the Bridgend suicides, the local MP, Madeleine Moon, said that she "found the PCC advice, support and guidance invaluable" and that "the best insurance policy to have is the telephone number of the Press Complaints Commission". The Samaritans say that the "support that the PCC provides Samaritans is hugely helpful in our work to ensure responsible reporting of suicide".

Stephen Abell

Director, Press Complaints Commission

London EC1

This could be a make-or-break moment for the Press Complaints Commission. While it is vital to have senior journalists with sharp-end experience on the PCC, should they include serving editors and executives whose salaries and career ambitions still depend on the organisations who fund it? The public remains instinctively suspicious of governments (or judges) interfering with a free press and the PCC's key role is to retain that sentiment.

Paul Connew

St Albans, Hertfordshire

I had assumed that Nato-led, UN- sanctioned action in Libya was motivated by concern for the welfare of the general population. Nick Clegg, however, wants us to imagine the fate of "the lawyers, the students, the architects, the doctors, the nurses..." ("No one escapes the rage of a politician who goes down fighting", 24 April). Is he suggesting that the welfare of the unemployed, the construction workers, taxi drivers, farmers and other non-professional classes in Libya would be less deserving of our concern and intervention?

Con Lynch

Derryconnell, Schull, Ireland

Nick Clegg says it "can't be right that plum internships are decided by who you know, not what you know". But surely the whole concept of internships goes against the minimum wage, and the right of all workers to be paid a decent day's wage for a decent day's work.

Tim Mickleburgh

Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Under AV, whoever is elected must have commanded at least 50 per cent of first or second (or further) preferences, which is back to the principle of democratic rule. Whatever readers' views, I urge them to vote on Thursday: it would ironic if the issue were decided on a minority vote.

Malcolm Morrison

Swindon, Wiltshire

The topic of women's treatment in and by the Roman Catholic church is not aired enough in the serious media and I congratulate you on starting a serious discussion with "Defying the Pope?" (24 April). I look forward to in-depth analyses of women's disadvantaged situation, of the entrenched views of the Vatican leadership and the underlying wrong understanding of human sexuality. Women and men should speak about solidarity, leadership and sexuality, without the opinions of clerics who, having chosen a celibate lifestyle, cannot empathise with those who have not.

Dorothea McEwan

Via email

It is, indeed, a "funny old world" if Sarah Sands really believes that we Brits have a "work ethic" as opposed to the desire to ravish and dominate the world ("A fortnight of sun has turned us all into Italians", 24 April). She should visit Italy, where they really know how to work, rest and play. But that country is now overrun by tens of thousands of dispossessed Libyans who should be given sanctuary by the instigators of the latest military mission: America, France and Britain. London like Italy? In your wildest dreams!

J McAndrew

Blackpool, Lancashire

Teachers have 12 weeks' annual holiday, retire at 60, and feel hard done by. What can they be telling leavers about the world of work?

Imogen Swift

Southsea, Hampshire

I regularly make my own laver bread ("Seaweed grows on us...", 24 April). Rinsed five or six times, squeezed out, and simmered with a knob of butter for two to three hours, a bagful gives 18 servings, freezes well and is served with bacon, eggs and cockles for breakfast. Sets you up for the day!

Jan McKechnie

Swansea

Have your say

Letters to the Editor, Independent on Sunday, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5HF; email: sundayletters@independent.co.uk (with address; no attachments, please); fax: 020 7005 2627; online: independent.co.uk/dayinapage/2011/May/1

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive or Senior Sales Executive - B2B Exhibitions

£18000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Sales Executive or Senior Sal...

Recruitment Genius: Head of Support Services

£40000 - £55000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Warehouse Team Leader

£22000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This industry leading company produces h...

Recruitment Genius: Business Development Manager / Sales - OTE £40,000

£20000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This IT provider for the educat...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Former Tory MP Harvey Proctor speaks during a press conference at St Ermin's Hotel, London, where he insisted he is  

Harvey Proctor and a worrying case of justice by lynch mob

James Hanning
 

Peerages: from birthright to bauble is not progress

John Rentoul
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border
Doris Lessing: Acclaimed novelist was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show

'A subversive brothel keeper and Communist'

Acclaimed novelist Doris Lessing was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show
Big Blue Live: BBC's Springwatch offshoot swaps back gardens for California's Monterey Bay

BBC heads to the Californian coast

The Big Blue Live crew is preparing for the first of three episodes on Sunday night, filming from boats, planes and an aquarium studio
Austin Bidwell: The Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England with the most daring forgery the world had known

Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England

Conman Austin Bidwell. was a heartless cad who carried out the most daring forgery the world had known
Car hacking scandal: Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked

Car hacking scandal

Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked
10 best placemats

Take your seat: 10 best placemats

Protect your table and dine in style with a bold new accessory
Ashes 2015: Alastair Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

Aussie skipper Michael Clarke was lured into believing that what we witnessed at Edgbaston and Trent Bridge would continue in London, says Kevin Garside
Can Rafael Benitez get the best out of Gareth Bale at Real Madrid?

Can Benitez get the best out of Bale?

Back at the club he watched as a boy, the pressure is on Benitez to find a winning blend from Real's multiple talents. As La Liga begins, Pete Jenson asks if it will be enough to stop Barcelona
Athletics World Championships 2015: Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jessica Ennis-Hill and Katarina Johnson-Thompson heptathlon rivalry

Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jess and Kat rivalry

The last time the two British heptathletes competed, Ennis-Hill was on the way to Olympic gold and Johnson-Thompson was just a promising teenager. But a lot has happened in the following three years
Jeremy Corbyn: Joining a shrewd operator desperate for power as he visits the North East

Jeremy Corbyn interview: A shrewd operator desperate for power

His radical anti-austerity agenda has caught the imagination of the left and politically disaffected and set a staid Labour leadership election alight
Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief: Defender of ancient city's past was killed for protecting its future

Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief

Robert Fisk on the defender of the ancient city's past who was killed for protecting its future