IoS letters, emails & online postings (4 August 2013)

Share

Applying openly for a job regardless of background is not a criminal offence ("Dangerous criminals caught trying to get school jobs", 21 July). Not all "serious ex-offenders" are or have been a threat to children. Some of these people are well educated and are now caring parents themselves.

Supposing a person convicted of bank robberies in the 1970s, educated himself while in prison and went on to become the chief executive of a national charity. This is how the charity Unlock was founded. Should the CEO of Unlock be barred from working in schools? The current thinking would suggest yes.

Should the youth who committed robbery offences and was sentenced to several years in youth custody, who then went on to graduate with first-class honours and achieve a higher degree as an adult while working with vulnerable people for 15 years, now be categorised a "dangerous criminal"? The current thinking is yes.

If society recognises reformed people, perhaps media reporting will stop constructing negative identities that in turn reinforce limited life opportunities.

Gary Bowness

Durham

Congratulations on highlighting the way progress in the promotion and development of women's sport is "dissipating" ("Women's sport has far to go", 28 July). You rightly identify that elite women competitors need, and deserve, more media attention, which would help to attract sponsorship and encourage participation. The final of Euro 2013 was a great showcase. But, with girls now less active from the age of eight, we need to see far more activity at grassroots level.

Schools have a major role to play in this, but the bodies administering sports also need to do more. Far too many continue to be havens of misogyny, with few women in senior positions. Sport and physical activity need to be clearly for, and clearly available to, everyone. A modest investment can have a major return in terms of lifelong health and wellbeing.

Natalie Bennett

Leader, Green Party London NW1

Since you devoted hundreds of words to the lack of respect for women's sport, I turned to your sports pages for a player-by-player preview of the European Championship football final later that day and a full report on the Hansa Ladies' Masters golf tournament, the final European Tour event before the Women's Open. The wheels certainly turn slowly when you don't report female sport on your own pages.

Katharine Sinderson

Grimsby, Lincolnshire

FGM is so deeply ingrained in some Muslim countries that it could be many decades before the nasty procedure dies out (Letters, 28 July). Girls in the UK have legal protection now, but boys, who also suffer genital cutting, do not. My late husband lost his foreskin for no good reason. When genital cutting is openly discussed, and exposed as the crime it really is, all children will grow up whole.

Hazel Thomas

Newtown, Powys

In vitro technology will spell the end of lorries full of cows and chickens, abattoirs and factory farming ("Meat: the future", 28 July). It will reduce carbon emissions, conserve water and make the food supply safer. Mock meat made from nuts, soya, beans and grain exist already and offer the taste of meat without cholesterol or cruelty. But lab-grown meat will provide people who were addicted from childhood to the saturated fat in flesh with the "methadone" for their habit.

Ben Williamson

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

London, N1

I think "our new obsession with the Seventies" is not because the key social changes of the Sixties began to take affect outside central London (D J Taylor, 28 July). Rather, it's that those in the media are now too young to remember the 1960s, having come of age in the 1970s, as I did.

Tim Mickleburgh

Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Your leading article is right ("Online bullying is still abuse", 28 July). Online bullying should be more robustly patrolled. On the other hand, would I trust ex-Bullingdon Club member David Cameron to do this? No.

Keith Flett

London N17

Have your say

Letters to the Editor, The Independent on Sunday, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5HF. Email: sundayletters@independent.co.uk. Online: independent.co.uk/dayinapage/2013/August/4

React Now

  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: IT Buyer

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This award winning IT company are currently re...

Recruitment Genius: IT Account Manager

£20000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Recruitment Genius: Domestic Gas Breakdown Engineers

£28000 - £32000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Domestic Gas Breakdown Engineer...

Recruitment Genius: Domestic Gas Breakdown Engineers

£28000 - £32000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Domestic Gas Breakdown Engineer...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Zoe Sugg, aka Zoella, with her boyfriend, fellow vlogger Alfie Deyes  

What the advertising world can learn from Zoella's gang

Danny Rogers
Rachel Reeves is the shadow Work and Pensions Secretary  

What are we voting for? No one knows

Stefano Hatfield
No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor