Letters: Briefly

Share
You criticise the Havels for honeymooning in Belgium ("Flat Earth", 23 February). Well at least they had the insight not to go to Britain, the country of the Dunblane killings, the Bulger case, child abuse scandals, several recent miscarriages of justice, not to mention BSE. How easy it is to sum up a country in a few negatives.

Bert de Fre, Gent, Belgium On 7 January 1996 you published the following letter: "Since much of astrology's reputation stands on its forecasting accuracy, you may like to judge the following after the due dates: 1) UK general election, February 1997. Labour wins, majority around 50 seats. 2) Prince Charles becomes king due to the Queen's abdication in June 2000. 3) Clinton is re-elected in November 1996. 4) A new radical Pope will be elected in September 1996." Three dates past, two incorrect. More evidence that astrology deserves its poor reputation.

Iain Sharp

Whitley Bay, Tyne & Wear

It is misleading to describe the central east European nations' desire to seek protection as Nato expansion ("A nightmare for the year 2000", 23 February). The dominating factor is their wish to avoid another 50-year nightmare. Having signed them away to Russian domination at Yalta in 1945, Western democracies have a moral duty to help.

I Pikelis, Birmingham B37

"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated" - Mahatma Gandi. Further debate on the issue of cloning seems superfluous.

Andrew Lane

Cairndow, Argyll

The marketing men have done Penguin no favours ("The future may not be orange", Review, 23 February) but the roots of its crisis lie elsewhere. Until the 1970s it appealed to a popular left-wing sentiment. The audience is still there but Penguin now ignores it. While a left-wing critique of Tony Blair would sell by the boxload for example, Penguin has published instead an apologia by Tony Wright.

Keith Davies, Cardiff

Peter Corrigan says that "Racist remarks ... if not excusable ... are preferable to the physical variety" in football (Sport, 23 February). Wrong. The system can get to grips with the physical consequences; it's the remarks that exacerbate the deep-seated nature of this problem. Absent the remarks and confrontations diminish.

Michael Bailey

Colyton, Devon The growing powers of tax officials provokes indignation ("Why a junior tax inspector...", 23 February) yet we complain about tax evasion. We cannot have it both ways. As long as we rely on taxes on earnings, inspectors must have the necessary powers - sometimes draconian - to investigate. If we don't like it, we must seek alternative sources or revenue.

Henry Law, Brighton

Ian Garrow of Headway is wrong to say that the charity "still has to get any money from the National Lottery" ("Charity blames Diana for slump in fortunes", 23 February). So far, the board has awarded it pounds 517,742.

Paul Hensby, National Lottery Charities Board, London WC2

React Now

  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: PPC Executive - Manchester City Centre

£23000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This forward-thinking agency wo...

Recruitment Genius: Artwork Design Apprenticeship

£7200 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An Artwork Design Apprenticeship is avail...

Recruitment Genius: PHP Web Developer

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This web design and digital age...

Recruitment Genius: Senior Web Designer / Front End Developer

£28000 - £32000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This fast expanding web managem...

Day In a Page

Read Next
 

i Editor's Letter: Why it won’t be the i wot won it – our promise to you

Oliver Duff Oliver Duff
A relative of dead Bangladeshi blogger Washiqur Rahman reacts after seeing his body at Dhaka Medical College in Dhaka on March 30,  

Atheists are being hacked to death in Bangladesh, and soon there will be none left

Rory Fenton
No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor