Letters: Don't subject yet more people to flight-path misery

 

Share

 

It is not often that I agree with Boris Johnson (report, 4 September), but anyone making decisions about whether to increase the capacity of Heathrow should have to spend at least a year living under the flight path.

Why, when planes take off and land east/west, is it thought reasonable to have additional capacity sited east or west of the most densely populated part of the country, ensuring the maximum disturbance to the maximum number of people?

Jane Eades

(woken yet again at 5am)

London SW11

 

As someone who lives alongside the Thames estuary, and knows the haunting beauty of Pip's graves at Cooling church, I ask: why must all infrastructure development and investment be in the south-east?

This is an area that in past years has experienced blazing summers, but also endures long periods of unmoving fog and frost in winter, and the occasional Siberian blast.

There is a heronry on the estuary, and it is home to numerous visiting feeding and breeding aquatic bird species. This must surely increase the risk of bird strike to aircraft.

If it is time for big ideas, then build it elsewhere, where the jobs and businesses will be welcome.

Cedric Narbroug

Gravesend, Kent

 

Before the holiday season comes to an end, could I ask some of your readers to glance out of their aircraft windows as they pass over the coast of Kent and reflect on the current government policy on the expansion of airports in the south east? Twenty thousand feet below they will see a pristine, almost unused, 9,000ft runway at Manston near Ramsgate. It is served by dual carriageway and motorway all the way to London and a main railway line passes within 400 metres of the airport boundary. While controversy rages over Heathrow and “Boris Island” perhaps we should examine what kind of political and commercial chicanery prevents the use of existing facilities like Manston. Can we not make use of this airport before concreting over another few hundred acres of our beautiful countryside?

Peter Medwell

Broadstairs, Kent

 

The row about a third runway at Heathrow might make it seem as though the needs of the environment and the UK economy pull in different directions (“The Green case against expansion”, 30 August).

New research shows the opposite: the UK's green economy is a great success story. Since the financial crisis, low-carbon and environmental companies have grown by well over 10 per cent, while UK GDP has shrunk. Furthermore, the green economy now employs almost 1 million people, vastly more than the number of jobs in telecommunications and only slightly behind those in finance and insurance.

The same new research, done by the think-tank Green Alliance and funded by Christian Aid and others, also reveals that the Treasury is lagging behind the private sector when it comes to backing clean development. Most new infrastructure projects – railways, wind farms, broadband, water and sewage services – are low-carbon, and largely funded by the private sector. Most of the remaining, dirty infrastructure projects, roads, are funded largely by public money.

Dr Alison Doig

Christian Aid, London SE1

React Now

  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Ashdown Group: Trainee Consultant - Surrey/ South West London

£22000 per annum + pension,bonus,career progression: Ashdown Group: An establi...

Ashdown Group: Trainee Consultant - Surrey / South West London

£22000 per annum + pension,bonus,career progression: Ashdown Group: An establi...

Ashdown Group: Recruitment Consultant / Account Manager - Surrey / SW London

£40000 per annum + realistic targets: Ashdown Group: A thriving recruitment co...

Ashdown Group: Part-time Payroll Officer - Yorkshire - Professional Services

£25000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A successful professional services firm is lo...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Nicola Sturgeon could have considerable influence over David Cameron in a hung parliament  

General Election 2015: What if Cameron were to end up in hock to the SNP?

Steve Richards
Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before