Letters: Leveson's judgment on the press

Share

Leveson's great service has been to expose how intimately connected reputedly independent aspects of the establishment really are. We now know that Murdoch's panjandrums, David Cameron and members of the Metropolitan Police have all placed their buttocks on the same horse. That's the reason little will change as a result of the Leveson Report.

Sasha Simic

London N16

The press has to be independent of politicians, but it must not be independent of the law. Self-regulation has failed. We need to establish independent principles, backed by law, by which the press can operate in the public interest, and be judged.

Simon Molloy

London E8

Freedom of political expression – definitely yes. Freedom to tell lies – and this includes presenting made-up stories as news – definitely not. There should be effective penalties against those who publish untruths.

There should also be accessible means to pursue libel cases for those without pots of money.

Mike Simpson

Warlingham, Surrey

I wonder if I am alone in finding the media a tad anal in its coverage of the imminent release of the Leveson report? On Radio 2 this morning we almost had a countdown to the hour of the report's release, and the broadsheets (your esteemed organ included) give the impression of a nation holding its breath in the same way it must have awaited the outcome of Neville Chamberlain's trip to Munich in 1938.

I cannot imagine the same degree of nervous anticipation in your pages if this review concerned health and social services or the armed forces, both of which would be more significant.

I will be glad to see all this settled so that months of media navel gazing may end.

Peter Glover

Rayleigh, Essex

No more binge drinking for the working class

The millionaires, David Cameron and other MPs from both sides of the House, seem to believe fixing an alcohol minimum unit price will cure binge drinking. Whether it does or not is not for me to comment on, but "We are all in this together"? I think not.

A pound on a bottle of wine adds 33 per cent for the working class, 3.33 per cent for the middle class and 0.333 per for the rich, based on prices of £3, £30 and £300 a bottle. So, who, obviously, bears the greatest burden?

The Posh Boys will not notice it at all – a drop in the ocean. It's great to know that none of the rich ever drink too much.

Ken Mitchell

Nottingham

So our MPs want to introduce "minimum alcohol pricing" – the price of 45p per unit no doubt to rise year upon year – to "cure hooliganism and binge drinking".

Will those same MPs be setting an example by immediately introducing those same minimum prices in the Houses of Parliament bars, something they can do immediately and without legislation? The British public will judge them by the example they set.

Ian McNicholas

Ebbw Vale

You comment that "it is less expensive in Britain today to get drunk than to go to the cinema. That should not be so." (Leading article, 28 November.) I quite agree. Cinema tickets are too expensive; can the Government do something about this?

David Weston

Oxford

Grubby ethics go beyond the City

Terence Blacker laments that the "grubby greedy City ethic has worked its way down to us" (27 November). Is he sure which is the chicken and which is the egg?

The City scandals we have witnessed are simply the highest-profile symptoms of a malaise which affects our entire society. We are increasingly focused on the price of everything while understanding the value of almost nothing; we claim our individual rights while ignoring our collective obligations to a civil society.

This malaise has other symptoms than those highlighted by Mr Blacker, including almost universal willingness to speculate on property prices with scant consideration for the consequences, to become indebted in pursuit of personal consumption, and to pursue, at the expense of all dignity, celebrity as an instant route to wealth and recognition.

I do not disagree that the City (and wider global finance) has proven a fertile nurturing ground for the most obvious expression of this malaise, but I do not believe that it created it. We need to look deeply at our whole society; we cannot just point at the bogeymen in the City while convincing ourselves that, aside from their pernicious influence, our civil society, including its institutions and foundations, are all in good health; they are not.

Neil Rothwell

Haywards Heath, West Sussex

Cunning plan to defeat Ukip

With growing disenchantment about the EU, there seems to be concern within the Conservative Party that support for Ukip could do them electoral damage.

What is needed is some arrangement whereby those who favour Ukip could switch their votes to the Conservative candidate if he or she comes in ahead of theirs but behind Labour or the Lib Dems. I wonder if Messrs Cameron, Osborne or Hague can think of such a system. Oh yes, it's the one they comprehensibly rubbished during last year's AV referendum campaign.

John Riseley

Harrogate, North Yorkshire

I am old enough to remember door-to-door brush salesmen. Now that they may be coming back, I can envisage an excellent alternative career for Nigel Farage should his party founder.

Tim Wallace

Penzance, Cornwall

Still no jobs

While there are around only half a million job vacancies, yet 2.5 million people unemployed and seeking work, the failure of schemes to get people back to work should come as no surprise (report, 28 November). Training people in interview techniques is no substitute for creating jobs. Such schemes are little more than con tricks for, with all the help in the world, with overnight every vacancy filled, there would still be two million unemployed.

Peter Cave

London W1

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Digital Content Manager,Leicester

£24000 - £28000 per annum: Charter Selection: Leading Nationwide and important...

Commercial IP Solicitor - Oxford

Highly Attractive Package: Austen Lloyd: OXFORDSHIRE - COMMERCIAL IP /IT - We ...

Sales Director, Edgeware, Middlesex

£55 - £70K OTE £120k Plus Car: Charter Selection: Major multi-million pound la...

Citrix - 3rd Line Support

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: Citrix Specialist required by leading IT...

Day In a Page

lowers, candles and other tributes in front of the Netherlands Embassy in memory of the victims of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17  

To punish Putin for the MH17 disaster we must boycott Russia 2018

Jack Gilbert
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn
Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Alistair Carmichael: 'The UK as a whole is greater than the sum of its parts'

Meet the man who doesn't want to go down in history as the country's last Scottish Secretary
Legoland Windsor's master model-makers reveal the tricks of their trade (including how to stop the kids wrecking your Eiffel Tower)

Meet the people who play with Lego for a living

They are the master builders: Lego's crack team of model-makers, who have just glued down the last of 650,000 bricks as they recreate Paris in Windsor. Susie Mesure goes behind the scenes
The 20 best days out for the summer holidays: From Spitfires to summer ferry sailings

20 best days out for the summer holidays

From summer ferry sailings in Tyne and Wear and adventure days at Bear Grylls Survival Academy to Spitfires at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and bog-snorkelling at the World Alternative Games...
Open-air theatres: If all the world is a stage, then everyone gets in on the act

All the wood’s a stage

Open-air productions are the cue for better box-office receipts, new audiences, more interesting artistic challenges – and a picnic
Rand Paul is a Republican with an eye on the world

Rupert Cornwell: A Republican with an eye on the world

Rand Paul is laying out his presidential stall by taking on his party's disastrous record on foreign policy
Self-preservation society: Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish

Self-preservation society

Pickles are moving from the side of your plate to become the star dish
Generation gap opens a career sinkhole

Britons live ever longer, but still society persists in glorifying youth

We are living longer but considered 'past it' younger, the reshuffle suggests. There may be trouble ahead, says DJ Taylor