The Lady's not for remembering

Share
Related Topics
I am delighted to say that while she was in London I managed to persuade Baroness Thatcher to come into the office and tackle some of the many problems and inquiries that the readers have wanted her to answer. It is not often that Margaret Thatcher agrees to descend from Olympus, as it were, and we are very grateful that she deigned to accept the very substantial fee that she demanded for the service. All yours, Maggie!

It has often been pointed out that your entry in 'Who's Who' makes no reference to your mother, only to your father. As everyone writes their own autobiography in 'Who's Who', this must mean that you have deliberately omitted any mention of your mother. Would you care to enlighten readers of the 'Independent' as to why this is? Did you not in fact have a mother? Did you appear to your father by virgin birth?

Baroness Thatcher writes: As far as I can remember, I had no mother. This does not mean that I did not have a mother - rationally, I must have been the offspring of someone - only that I do not actually remember having one. When I conjure up a visual picture of life at home, I can only remember men - apart, that is, from me.

Above all, I can remember my father, the Alderman, of whom I have a distinct and very strong visual image as he bent forward listening to me, as I told him how the family unit should be run - advice, I am glad to say, that he always listened to.

Whether my mother was present on those occasions it is hard for me to say. If she was, she was not there strongly enough for me to remember her. If she was not, then perhaps she was not one of us.

After you left your family unit in Grantham, did you keep in close contact with your parents, or, perhaps, parent?

Baroness Thatcher writes: When I finally left Grantham to go to university and then be called to the Bar, I was often asked back to Grantham to give an annual lecture on the state of the family, which I always did gladly if I could fit it into my busy calendar. But of course when one has left a post of authority, the people left behind sometimes tend to ignore basic principles and let things go a bit.

Are you referring to your father there? Or to your mother? Or to John Major? Or ...

Baroness Thatcher writes: If you cannot decide which question you want to ask, perhaps we could have another questioner.

In 'Who's Who', you give as your recreations "music and reading". What instrument do you play?

Baroness Thatcher writes: Who ever gave you the idea that I played an instrument?

Well, you said you were interested in music ...

Baroness Thatcher writes: I haven't got time to play the stuff, fool! If I said I were interested in books, would that mean I had written any?

But you have written books!

Baroness Thatcher writes: Have I? Oh, yes, my years in Downing Street and all that. Well, I did not strictly write all those myself. I simply haven't got the time to bother myself with the day-to-day details of operations. I am more interested in the broad sweep, the master strategy, the big outline, the underlying principles. I am a conductor, not an orchestral player.

You mean, you WERE a conductor. You no longer have an orchestra.

Baroness Thatcher writes: On the contrary. I have an orchestra in every country. I am a guest conductor. I fly in, tell people how to run their country and fly out again.

Do you get paid in cash?

Baroness Thatcher writes: I get paid. How, is my business.

Do they take any notice of how you tell them to run their country? Do they follow your advice?

Baroness Thatcher writes: I have no idea. I do not stay around long enough to find out. I have a crowded schedule.

You mean, you take the money and run?

Baroness Thatcher writes: Next question, please!

Here is some money. Would you go away and not come back, please?

Baroness Thatcher writes: Certainly.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Junior Quant Analyst - C++, Boost, Data Mining

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Junior Quant Analyst - C++, Boost...

Service Desk Analyst- (Desktop Support, Help desk)

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Service Desk Analyst- (Desktop Su...

Junior Quant Analyst (Machine Learning, SQL, Brokerage)

£30000 - £50000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Junior Quant Analyst (Machine Lea...

UNIX Application Support Analyst- Support, UNIX, London

£45000 - £55000 per annum: Harrington Starr: UNIX Application Support Analyst-...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Mosul dam was retaken with the help of the US  

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Robert Fisk
 

Next they'll say an independent Scotland can't use British clouds...

Mark Steel
Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention