Zaha Hadid dead: The influential architect's most memorable designs

From the London Olympic Aquatic Centre to the Vitra Fire Station

Jess Denham@jess_denham
Thursday 31 March 2016 16:15
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Dame Zaha Hadid became the first woman to win the RIBA Gold Medal earlier this year
Dame Zaha Hadid became the first woman to win the RIBA Gold Medal earlier this year

Dame Zaha Hadid has sadly died aged 65 after suffering a heart attack but her famous designs have firmly established her has one of the most influential architects.

Born in Baghdad in 1950, Hadid was commissioned to design for a host of countries around the world from Germany to Azerbaijan and became the first woman to win the prestigious RIBA Gold Medal this year. The London Olympic Aquatic Centre, the Serpentine Sackler Gallery and Glasgow’s Riverside Museum are among her most famous designs and she won the coveted Stirling Prize twice.

Hadid’s first design was the Vita Fire Station close to the German-Swiss border, while her acclaimed interior designs include the Mind Zone at the former Millennium Dome in London. Other early projects include the Cardiff Bay Opera House and The Peak in Hong Kong.

Let’s take a moment to look back on Hadid’s lasting legacy:

“As a woman in architecture you’re always an outsider,” Hadid memorably said last September when receiving the Gold Medal.

“But it’s okay, I like being on the edge.”

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