Colin Firth becomes Italian citizen following Brexit

The actor has been married to Italian environmentalist Livia Giuggiol since 1997

Jack Shepherd
Sunday 24 September 2017 09:55
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The Oscar winner is vehemently anti-Brexit, and has self-described as an ‘enthusiastic European’
The Oscar winner is vehemently anti-Brexit, and has self-described as an ‘enthusiastic European’

Colin Firth has accepted an honorary Italian citizenship, becoming a dual Italian and British citizen. According to The Guardian, the Oscar-winning actor reportedly made the initial application in response to the UK leaving the European Union.

Firth previously spoke to one Australian publication about Brexit, saying: “Brexit does not have a single positive aspect for me. Many colleagues, including Emma Thompson, are – like me – enthusiastic Europeans. And we still cannot believe it."

The 57-year-old has been married to Italian environmentalist Livia Giuggiol since 1997. His agent has said the application for an Italian passport was a family decision. “Colin applied for dual citizenship [British and Italian] in order to have the same passports as his wife and children,” the agent said.

Firth has since offered an official statement, which reads: "A connection with Italy has existed for more than two decades now. I was married there and had two children born in Rome. My wife and I are both extremely proud of our own countries.

"We never really thought much about our different passports. But now, with some of the uncertainty around, we thought it sensible that we should all get the same. Livia is applying for a British passport. I will always be extremely British (you only have to look at or listen to me).

"Britain is our home and we love it here. Despite the enticements of my profession to relocate to more remunerative climes, I’ve always chosen to base my career out of the UK and pay my taxes here. That hasn’t changed."

The statement continued: "I married into Italy (and anyone will tell you when you marry an Italian you don’t just marry one person; you marry a family and perhaps an entire country…). Like almost everybody I have a passionate love of Italy and joining my wife and kids in being dual citizens will be a huge privilege.”

The Italian interior ministry in Rome said: “The very famous actor, who won an Oscar for the film The King’s Speech, is married to a citizen from our country and has often declared his love for our land.”

Firth and Giuggioli currently live in Chiswick with their two sons, and own a house near the Italian town of Città della Pieve.

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Firth’s announcement came just hours after Theresa May’s speech in Florence, in which the Prime Minister conceded that Britain would have to accept EU free movement and stay in the single market for at least two years after Brexit.

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