Morrisons pledges to reduce carbon emissions in supply chain

The supermarket said it aims to cut emissions by working more closely with its own-brand suppliers.

Simon Neville
Tuesday 14 December 2021 12:44
Morrisons is to work with suppliers to reduce carbon emissions (Ian West/PA)
Morrisons is to work with suppliers to reduce carbon emissions (Ian West/PA)

Morrisons has announced plans to work with its own-brand suppliers to reduce carbon emissions across parts of the supply chain out of its control by 30% by 2030.

The supermarket said it will encourage suppliers to reduce the greenhouse emissions associated with the sourcing, manufacture and transportation of products.

Bosses have offered 400 own-brand suppliers free access to a new industry-leading software platform, Manufacture 2030, which will allow the businesses to measure, track and forecast their operational carbon emissions.

We expect that this programme will remove thousands of tonnes of carbon from our supply chain a year - to make it easier for our customers to reduce the footprint of their shopping baskets

Steve Butts

Steve Butts, head of corporate services at Morrisons, said: “We’re asking our own-brand suppliers to join with us to tackle greenhouse gas emissions.

“As Morrisons is vertically integrated – we manufacture more than half of the fresh food we sell – we’re in a unique position to be able to offer support to the industry.

“We expect that this programme will remove thousands of tonnes of carbon from our supply chain a year – to make it easier for our customers to reduce the footprint of their shopping baskets.”

Morrisons has brought forward its commitment to reach net-zero carbon emissions in its own operations to 2035, five years earlier than initially pledged.

It is now focusing on its supply chain, which falls under so-called Scope 3 emissions, generated typically in the sourcing and transportation of goods from third-party companies.

The grocer said it is ahead of forecast in reducing its operational carbon emissions, reaching a 32% cut since 2017, with the aim of reaching 33% by 2025.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in