Lunar eclipse: How the blood moon will affect your mood

Spoiler alert: it probably won't

Sabrina Barr
Friday 27 July 2018 11:14
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Blood Moon 2018: the longest lunar eclipse of the century

Tonight, people in the Eastern Hemisphere will be treated to the rare, cosmic sight of a “blood moon”.

The lunar eclipse, which will reportedly be the longest of the century, will be avidly followed by astrology and astronomy aficionados alike.

There are some people who believe that lunar activity can have a direct effect on the moods of beings on Earth. Should this be believed, or is the claim unfounded?

The "lunar effect" is a term that refers to the believe that the lunar cycle can have a direct influence on the behaviour and mood of human beings.

In 2008, a study published in Current Biology by researchers at the University of Oxford and the Ludwig Maximilian University assessed how human behaviour is connected to lunar cycles, concluding that there is little evidence to support the notion that there is an intrinsic link between the two.

"Lunar cycles had, and continue to have, an influence upon human culture, though despite a persistent belief that our mental health and other behaviours are modulated by the phase of the moon, there is no solid evidence that human biology is in any way regulated by the lunar cycle," the study states.

Ilya Mandel, professor of theoretical astrophysics at the University of Birmingham’s School of Physics and Astronomy, is sceptical about the connection between the blood moon and one’s temperament.

He explains to The Independent what makes a blood moon such a significant event from an astronomical perspective.

“A blood moon is really a lunar eclipse,” he says. “An eclipse happens when three astronomical bodies line up in a straight line.

“When the Earth is between the Moon and the Sun, we get a lunar eclipse, because moonlight is actually reflected light from the Sun, and in this configuration the Earth is blocking sunlight from reaching the Moon.”

He explains how some of the Sun’s light is refracted by the Earth’s atmosphere, reaches the Moon and is then reflected back to Earth, which makes the Moon appear red in colour.

There are some who believe very strongly in astrology and the power that the blood moon may supposedly have over our actions.

Merilyn Keskula is the founder of Mylky Moon Lab, a company that helps women develop their businesses by tapping into natural cycles, and holds events and workshops at 42 Acres Shoreditch.

“Nothing is random - there’s always order in chaos,” she says in regard to the blood moon. “Seemingly predictable and unrelated events have a defined pattern.

“The blood moon and longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st Century will be the culmination of the storms of change we’ve been through recently, as individuals and as a society.”

Keskula is of the opinion that the current heatwave the country is experiencing could be a “physical manifestation of what is going on energetically all the time.”

“The blood moon will be amplified to the max by total lunar eclipse, sun in Leo (fire sign) and the Moon ‘hugging’ Mars on the same day - the red warrior planet of action, aggression and vitality," she says.

“The keyword for how we feel physically and mentally right now is ‘fire’.”

Victor Olliver, editor of the Astrological Journal, agrees with Keskula's views, saying that he believes that the positioning of the Sun, Moon, Earth and Mars could increase the likelihood of hasty behaviour.

“What makes this blood moon more challenging is that Mars (planet of sexuality, energy and determination) is on the same spot as the Moon,” he says.

“In other words, there’s a raised risk of violence or impulsive behaviour driven by raised emotions.”

For Paul Hill, founder of Sirius Astronomy, the only effect he thinks the blood moon will have on his mood will be wonderment as he observes the spectacle.

“There is no effect of a new Moon or lunar eclipse on human emotion or mood beyond enjoying the awe and wonder of observing one of the natural wonders of the universe as the Moon passes briefly into the shadow of the Earth,” he says.

“While the Moon controls the tides and the axial wobble of the Earth, it has no direct effect on humans beyond a pleasing view and the emotions, mythology, stories and legends we project onto it as part of our human story.”

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