Carillion job losses top 1,450 as more redundancies are announced

Before going into liquidation, Carillion employed around 46,000 people worldwide, of which 20,000 were in UK

Josie Co
Business Editor
@JosieCox_London
Monday 05 March 2018 16:39
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Carillion, which was one of the Government’s most important contractors, crashed into liquidation on 15 January
Carillion, which was one of the Government’s most important contractors, crashed into liquidation on 15 January

An additional 87 people have lost their jobs as a result of the dramatic collapse of Carillion earlier this year, taking the total number of redundancies to almost 1,460.

A spokesperson for the Official Receiver, which is the body handling the construction and services firm’s liquidation, said on Monday that a further 150 employees had now been transferred to suppliers that had picked up contracts previously held by Carillion.

That means that 45 per cent of the pre-liquidation workforce has now been given “secure ongoing employment”. But the latest batch of redundancies means that a total of 1,458 individuals have now lost their jobs as a result of the firm’s failure.

The spokesperson said that Jobcentre Plus’ Rapid Response Service would provide those who are now out of work with support to find new roles. Those affected are also entitled to make a claim for statutory redundancy payments.

“Discussions with potential purchasers continue,” the spokesperson said. “I am continuing to engage with staff, elected employee representatives and unions to keep them informed as these arrangements are confirmed.”

Carillion, which was one of the Government’s most important contractors, crashed into liquidation on 15 January having battled substantial debt and a persistent slowdown across many of its markets. It was also plagued by a gaping pension deficit.

Shortly before going into liquidation, the group employed some 46,000 people worldwide, of which 20,000 were in the UK.

It held major contracts for prisons, the NHS and the armed forces. Only in July last year, it won major contracts to build the new High Speed Two rail line, to connect London with the north of the country.

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