Cyber attackers have stolen bank details of one fifth of UK customers

Some 21 per cent of people living in the UK had their bank accounts used to buy goods and services as results of cyber-security breach

Zlata Rodionova
Monday 23 November 2015 11:48 GMT
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Banks fear imminent Russian cyber-attack
Banks fear imminent Russian cyber-attack (Reuters)

Data protection will soon become UK consumers number one priority as new study reveals that one in five Brits have had personal details stolen used as a result of a cyber-security breach.

Some 21 per cent of people living in the UK had their bank accounts used to buy goods and services as results of cyber-security breach, according to new research by business advisory firm Deloitte.

The survey of nearly 1,500 UK customers found that over 70 per cent would reconsider using a company if it failed to keep their data safe.

However, more than half don’t know the exact details of the information that has been collected and just 23 per cent believe that companies are being transparent about it.

“The volume and value of data available online means that consumers are now more exposed than ever before,” said Simon Browick director in the cyber risk services team at Deloitte

“Many organisations are struggling to prepare themselves to deal with the wide range of different cyber-attacks. Cyber security has moved beyond simply being an IT issue; it is now a business-wide risk which requires immediate attention at the highest level,” he added.

Since 2013, there has been a significant increase in the number of consumers taking action following a security breach. More than 75 per of respondents would conduct a security review after a cyber-attack, up from 52 per cent in 2013 or reduce their online activity altogether.

Ben Perkins, head of consumer business research at Deloitte, said: “Consumers have been very clear in their message to businesses and third party organisations: data security is paramount.

“At the same time, consumers now have greater awareness of cyber-crime and internet fraud and are, perhaps understandably, more distrustful of companies looking after their data.

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