Four charts that show what it takes to be one of the UK's 117 billionaires

Are you a man with a June birthday and a London property empire? You could be in luck.

Hazel Sheffield
Monday 27 April 2015 19:14
Comments
The wealthiest woman in the UK is Kirsty Bertarelli, who is 28 times better off than the Queen
The wealthiest woman in the UK is Kirsty Bertarelli, who is 28 times better off than the Queen

Did you look at the Sunday Times Rich List released this weekend and think: why not me? In answer to that plea, we looked at the numbers to find out exactly what kind of person you have to be to make it - other than rich.

Just being rich isn't enough. It would have taken a mere £15 million to get on the list in 1997. These days you need £100 million to hit even the bottom spot.

That's partly because London is a magnet for the super-rich. Its taxes are lower than elsewhere, it has a robust legal system, and it speaks a global language. The UK also has a good geographical location in Europe, but not in the eurozone, which has suffered so much with recent events in Greece and Ukraine. Add to that a strong education system, excellent cultural life, liberal politics and convenient time zone that crosses over with trading hours in Asia in the morning and New York in the afternoon.

All but two of the UK's top 20 billionaires have settled here from elsewhere. The two with claim to British heritage are The Duke of Westminster and and the Weston family, who have stakes in Primark and Fortnum & Masons.

Unsurprisingly, most of the UK's 117 billionaires live in London.

It helps to be born in summer. From what can be gleaned of the 1000 richest people in the UK, Geminis and Leos are more likely to be billionaires. Geminis are known for being excellent communicators, while Leos are said to make good leaders. Secretive Scorpios are out of luck - if this top thousand are any indication, they are around half as likely to be rich as Geminis.

The Sunday Times was upbeat about the gender divide. It stated that there are "more self-made women on our list than ever". But the numbers speak for themselves: the quickest way for a woman to get super-rich is through marriage. The wealthiest woman in the UK is Kirsty Bertarelli, who is 28 times better off than the Queen. Bertarelli shares her husband's husband's £9.45 billion fortune. She ran his pharmaceutical company, Serono, for ten years.

Pharmaceuticals are not the most popular way to make cash - that belongs to property, investments and oil and gas. Of the top 20 billionaires (more appear in the chart as some billionaires are involved in more than one sector) property is a popular choice of investment. The Barclay brothers, at number 13, are known for buying up London's hotels. The Duke of Westminster, who lands at number eight with an £8.56 billion fortune, owns most of Mayfair. Even if you're on the property ladder, that's a very steep ladder to climb.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in