Morrisons puts misshapen seasonal vegetables back on shelves to cut food waste

Morrisons has reported rising sales of potatoes and carrots from a trial of 'wonky' seasonal vegetables

Samuel Osborne@SamuelOsborne93
Saturday 19 December 2015 00:06
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The 'wonky' vegetables are chosen because they are either misshapen, have growth cracks or are smaller or larger than average
The 'wonky' vegetables are chosen because they are either misshapen, have growth cracks or are smaller or larger than average

Morrisons has put misshapen vegetables back on its shelves following criticism for wasting food.

The supermarket chain has reported rising sales of potatoes and carrots from a trial of "wonky" seasonal vegetables in stores in Yorkshire and the north-east.

An earlier attempt to sell misshapen courgettes was branded "pathetic" by celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.

The wonky vegetables are chosen by farmers because they are either misshapen, have growth cracks or are smaller or larger than average.

They are often discounted by around a third of the price because customers may need to spend more time peeling them, or might not be able to use the whole of the vegetable.

The trial began in 75 stores in December and will be expanded to another 75 stores, including supermarkets in the Midlands.

Morrisons said initial sales had been "promising".

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