MPs snub 190,000-strong petition calling for no confidence vote in David Cameron

The e-petition, which accuses Mr Cameron of causing 'devastation for the poorest in society for the last 5 years', will not be debated by MPs despite it easily passing the 100,000-signatures threshold 

Matt Dathan
Online political reporter
@matt_dathan
Thursday 19 November 2015 13:08
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David Cameron introduced the e-petition initiative after entering Downing Street in 2010
David Cameron introduced the e-petition initiative after entering Downing Street in 2010

MPs have snubbed a 190,000-strong petition calling for a no confidence vote in David Cameron.

The e-petition, which accuses Mr Cameron of causing "devastation for the poorest in society for the last 5 years," took advantage of an iniative introduced by Mr Cameron in 2010 allowing members of the public to suggest motions for MPs to debate in Parliament.

It easily won the backing of more than 100,000 names within six months - the threshold needed for MPs to consider the motion for debate.

However, MPs on the Petitions Committee rejected it, claiming it did not have the power to schedule debates on motions of no confidence.

That reason did not stop the committee granting a debate following a similar petition for a no confidence vote on Jeremy Hunt, with MPs debating the changes in "contracts and conditions in the NHS".

The Petitions Committee said there would not be debating any motion relating to the petition on a no confidence vote in the Prime Minister.

Successful petitions granted a debate in Parliament this month include a motion calling for a sugar tax to improve children's health, which won the backing of more than 150,000 names.

A spokesman for the House of Commons said: "The Committee decided not to schedule a debate on this petition, because it does not have the power to schedule debates on motions of no confidence, and the petition does not contain a specific request for action on policy."

Petitions that reach 10,000 names receive a response from the Government, however despite passing this threshold months ago ministers have yet to respond.

Civil servants removed more than 6,000 "fraudelent" signatures from the petition earlier this month.

Mr Cameron introduced the e-petition initiative when he entered Downing Street in 2010 in a bid to boost democracy and transparency.

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