Paddington Bear stars in fake deportation notices created by Home Office staff protesting Rwanda plan

The posted put up by Home Office staff are in protest of the government’s refugee policies

<p>The posters describe Paddington Bear’s illegal route to the UK </p>

The posters describe Paddington Bear’s illegal route to the UK

Deportation notices for Paddington Bear have been put up by staff on internal Home Office noticeboards in protest of refugees being deported to Rwanda.

The notices say the fictional bear is wanted for a pending relocation flight to Rwanda and add that he arrived illegally in the UK via boat and without a visa.

The posters are a part of a campaign by internal Home Office staff who are speaking out against the government’s new refugee policies, including deporting refugees to Rwanda.

The group of staff, who go by ‘Our Home Office’ on Twitter, say they are doing this in protest of what they describe as a “barbaric” proposal.

Speaking to The Guardian, an organiser of the group said: “The announcement of the Rwanda transportation plan was really a significant moment for a lot of staff members who were quite shocked by how barbaric a proposal it is, particularly the way that it seems to be against the refugee convention and the principles that we are trying to uphold of giving people fair treatment.

“No one expects working in the Home Office to be easy but this has pushed a lot of people over the edge,” they added.

The official-looking notices depict Paddington Bear and describe identifying details such as his red hat, blue coat and fur along with distinctive behaviours such as eating marmalade sandwiches.

They say the bear arrived in the UK via a “clandestine irregular route, using a small boat” and also make reference to Paddington’s appearance in a skit with Queen Elizabeth II for her platinum jubilee.

They add that Paddington “may have infiltrated important establishment networks including Buckingham Palace”, accompanied with an image of the Queen sharing tea with the bear, as depicted in the skit.

The Queen takes tea with Paddington Bear in a skit for her platinum jubilee

The notices are amongst others that have been placed around internal offices, such as ‘Refugee Welcome’ stickers and those rewording Home Office mission statements.

One notice reads: “Courageous: We have the spine to say ‘no, minister’. No to hostile environments, no to shutting down democracy, no to racist deportations.”

In a statement, a Home Office spokesperson said: “Thousands of civil servants work tirelessly every day on priorities that matter to the British people, and the Home Office has worked hard to be as constructive and open with staff on our policies.

“We urge all civil servants to use the mechanisms available to them to provide feedback. It is disappointing some staff are taking action that is detrimental to the department and we will take action where necessary.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in