Theresa May: What the MP set to become Prime Minister believes on human rights

The Home Secretary’s voting record includes a consistent commitment to repealing human rights laws and those preventing climate change

Andrew Griffin
Monday 11 July 2016 13:27
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Home Secretary Theresa May officially launches her campaign to become prime minister at Austin Court in Birmingham
Home Secretary Theresa May officially launches her campaign to become prime minister at Austin Court in Birmingham

Theresa May is about to become Prime Minister after a career of opposing legislation that guarantees equality and human rights.

The MP and home secretary has repeatedly indicated that she would look to repeal laws that guarantee human rights in Britain. She also has a record of voting against equality legislation and measures that prevent climate change.

Most recently, at the end of May, Theresa May voted in favour of repealing the Human Rights Act. She has repeatedly criticised human rights legislation for limiting the powers of government – a position that has led to criticism even from fellow cabinet members.

In 2013, Ms May voted against a law that would have made it illegal for people to discriminate on the basis of caste.

She was absent for votes on human rights protections in the immigration bill in 2014 and for another bill that looks to repeal the human rights act, in 2012.

Since Ms May has been in the home office for much of her recent career, her foreign policy decisions have received less focus. She has largely voted in line with her colleagues on those decisions – primarily supporting intervention overseas and with a mixed record on further integration with the European Union.

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She voted consistently for going to war in Iraq, as well as the deployment of UK troops in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan.

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