US police unable to arrest African ambassador accused of beating his daughter because of diplomatic immunity

Neighbours called police to the Equatorial Guinea embassy after hearing a commotion

Rose Troup Buchanan
Thursday 28 August 2014 18:24
Comments
Equatorial Guinea ambassador Ruben Maye Nsue Mangue
Equatorial Guinea ambassador Ruben Maye Nsue Mangue

Police say they were unable to arrest the Equatorial Guinea ambassador after he allegedly beat his daughter with a wooden chair leg so badly she required a visit to the hospital because of his diplomatic status.

Washington police were called to investigate the residence ambassador Ruben Maye Nsue Mangue on Monday night, after a 911 call said: “There’s someone going crazy at her house”.

The news site ARLnow first reported the claims, citing a tipster, that the ambassador was the attacker and his teenage daughter was the victim.

Police spokesman Dustin Sternbeck refused to comment on the identity of the female victim, who was taken to Virginia Hospital centre with a “significant laceration” to her head, bruises and a swollen eye.

“We determined the ambassador was the primary suspect,” he said.

In a crime report published earlier this week, Arlington County Police said: “The subject has full diplomatic immunity and was not arrested”.

Diplomatic staff have full immunity unless their country agrees to waive it, usually only when they are accused of a serious crime.

Recently, ambassadors to the UK were shown to have violated a number of laws but were not prosecuted as they were protected by immunity.

Yesterday, AP claimed an anonymous individual at the embassy confirmed a girl had been taken to hospital.

However, following on from this call another individual – who also refused to be named – said Mangue’s daughter was in good spirits.

Equatorial Guinea, located in central Africa, is one of sub-Sahara’s largest oil producers and the richest country on the African continent.

However, less than half of the population have access to clean drinking water and 20 per cent of children die before reaching five, according to figures released by the UN.

The Equatorial Guinea embassy in London was unavailable to comment.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in