Bernie Sanders publishes tax returns showing $205,000 earnings following Hillary Clinton's challenge

Hillary Clinton was paid $675,000 for just three speeches by banking giant Goldman Sachs

Mr Sanders' grassroots campaign is funded by 3 million small donors
Mr Sanders' grassroots campaign is funded by 3 million small donors

Bernie Sanders has revealed he earns $205,000 dollars (£145,000) a year, after being challenged by Hillary Clinton to publish his tax returns.

Mr Sanders' annual income, which is shared with his wife, is less than his multimillionaire rival made for three recent speeches delivered to Goldman Sachs employees.

The banking giant paid Ms Clinton $675,000 (£475,000) for the appearances. She and her husband have an estimated net worth of $110m (£77m), far surpassing the Sanders, who are worth around $300,000 (£210,000).

Income inequality has been a key plank of Mr Sanders' campaign, leading Ms Clinton to challenge him to publish his earnings. On Thursday, she said: "I've released 30 years of tax returns, and I think every candidate, including Senator Sanders and Donald Trump, should do the same."

Bernie Sanders Sticks It To Corporate America in New York Rally

The veteran Senator rapidly fired back, saying: “They are very boring tax returns. No big money from speeches, no major investments.Unfortunately, I remain one of the poorer members of the United States Senate.”

Ms Clinton generally commands a minimum of $225,000 per speech, or over four times as much as the $52,000 (£36,000) the average American citizen earns in a year. She once pocketed $315,000 for a 20-minute address to Ebay staff.

Mr Sanders' income, by way of contrast, is largely derived from his $175,000 Senate salary. His wife, Jane Sanders, makes $5,000 annually as a radioactive waste disposal commisioner, and the couple also receive social security benefits and a small annual pension.

With an estimated wealth of around $3m, the average US Senator is worth 10 times as much as Mr Sanders. While his income puts him in the top 5 per cent of US earners, the Vermont senator is one of the poorest 20 per cent of members of the Senate.

He also has tens of thousands of dollars in credit card debt, a rental property in Vermont capital Burlington and a condo in Washington, DC.

Mr Sanders has raised nearly $140m to support his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, without recourse to big business or Super PAC backing. His campaign is almost entirely funded by an estimated three million small donors.

All 10 companies cited by Mr Sanders as "America's biggest tax dodgers" have donated directly to Ms Clinton's $220m campaign or the Clinton Family Foundation.

Neither Mr Sanders nor Mr Clinton, however, come close to matching Donald Trump. The tycoon has not published any tax returns, but is believed to be worth somewhere between $3bn and $10bn.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in